logo
Snarky Security  Trust No One, Especially Not Us… Because We Know That Nothing Is Truly Security
О проекте Просмотр Уровни подписки Фильтры Обновления проекта Контакты Поделиться Метки
Все проекты
О проекте
Reading about IT and InfoSecurity press, watching videos and following news channels can be a rather toxic activity and bad idea, as it involves discarding the important information from a wide array of all the advertising, company PR, and news article.

Given that my readers, in the absence of sufficient time, have expressed a desire to «be more informed on various IT topics», I’m proposing a project that will do both short-term and long-term analysis, reviews, and interpretations of the flow of information I come across.

Here’s what’s going to happen:
— Obtaining hard-to-come-by facts and content
— Making notes on topics and trends that are not widely reflected in public information field

QA — directly or via email snarky_qa@outlook.com
Публикации, доступные бесплатно
Уровни подписки
Единоразовый платёж

Your donation fuels our mission to provide cutting-edge cybersecurity research, in-depth tutorials, and expert insights. Support our work today to empower the community with even more valuable content.

*no refund, no paid content

Помочь проекту
Casual Reader 1 500₽ месяц 16 200₽ год
(-10%)
При подписке на год для вас действует 10% скидка. 10% основная скидка и 0% доп. скидка за ваш уровень на проекте Snarky Security

Ideal for casual readers who are interested in staying informed about the latest trends and updates in the cybersecurity world.

Оформить подписку
Pro Reader 3 000₽ месяц 30 600₽ год
(-15%)
При подписке на год для вас действует 15% скидка. 15% основная скидка и 0% доп. скидка за ваш уровень на проекте Snarky Security

Designed for IT professionals, cybersecurity experts, and enthusiasts who seek deeper insights and more comprehensive resources. + Q&A

Оформить подписку
Фильтры
Обновления проекта
Контакты

Контакты

Поделиться
Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Russia seeks to build powerful IT ecosystem

The ‎scandalous‏ ‎article ‎«Russia ‎seeks ‎to ‎build‏ ‎a ‎fully‏ ‎state-controlled‏ ‎IT ‎ecosystem» is ‎simply‏ ‎overflowing ‎with‏ ‎intrigue, ‎jealousy ‎and ‎envy.‏ ‎How‏ ‎could ‎you‏ ‎even ‎try‏ ‎to ‎create ‎your ‎own ‎digital‏ ‎world,‏ ‎free ‎from‏ ‎the ‎clutches‏ ‎of ‎these ‎annoying ‎Western ‎technologies‏ ‎and‏ ‎services.‏ ‎Especially ‎against‏ ‎the ‎background‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎fact‏ ‎that ‎people‏ ‎have ‎begun ‎to ‎worry ‎about‏ ‎data ‎privacy‏ ‎and‏ ‎are ‎already ‎suing‏ ‎the ‎poor‏ ‎giants ‎of ‎Silicon ‎Valley‏ ‎right‏ ‎and ‎left.

And‏ ‎who ‎is‏ ‎the ‎culprit ‎of ‎the ‎celebration‏ ‎—‏ ‎the ‎Vkontakte‏ ‎company, ‎a‏ ‎modest ‎mail ‎service ‎that ‎has‏ ‎turned‏ ‎into‏ ‎a ‎digital‏ ‎conglomerate. ‎«How‏ ‎dare ‎he,‏ ‎»‏ ‎the ‎author‏ ‎is ‎outraged, ‎although ‎he ‎only‏ ‎made ‎the‏ ‎lives‏ ‎of ‎his ‎compatriots‏ ‎more ‎comfortable,‏ ‎convenient ‎and ‎safe.

It ‎is‏ ‎simply‏ ‎incredible ‎how‏ ‎Russia ‎managed‏ ‎to ‎create ‎such ‎an ‎impressive‏ ‎IT‏ ‎ecosystem, ‎leaving‏ ‎other ‎countries‏ ‎in ‎the ‎shadow. ‎And ‎the‏ ‎courage‏ ‎and‏ ‎audacity ‎to‏ ‎develop ‎a‏ ‎digital ‎ecosystem‏ ‎that‏ ‎includes ‎many‏ ‎services ‎potentially ‎used ‎by ‎every‏ ‎citizen ‎is‏ ‎simply‏ ‎amazing. ‎This ‎ecosystem,‏ ‎designed ‎to‏ ‎help ‎manage ‎information ‎and‏ ‎improve‏ ‎the ‎quality‏ ‎of ‎life‏ ‎of ‎Russians, ‎is ‎something ‎that‏ ‎other‏ ‎countries ‎can‏ ‎only ‎dream‏ ‎of.

The ‎whole ‎article ‎talks ‎about‏ ‎how‏ ‎unpleasant‏ ‎it ‎is‏ ‎for ‎Western‏ ‎countries ‎to‏ ‎see‏ ‎that ‎Russia‏ ‎is ‎reaping ‎the ‎benefits ‎of‏ ‎this ‎IT‏ ‎ecosystem.‏ ‎They ‎have ‎achieved‏ ‎digital ‎sovereignty,‏ ‎expanded ‎their ‎information ‎management‏ ‎capabilities,‏ ‎and ‎even‏ ‎increased ‎their‏ ‎resilience ‎to ‎economic ‎sanctions. ‎Their‏ ‎e-government‏ ‎and ‎payment‏ ‎systems ‎are‏ ‎superior ‎to ‎some ‎Western ‎countries,‏ ‎which‏ ‎leads‏ ‎to ‎increased‏ ‎efficiency ‎of‏ ‎public ‎services‏ ‎and‏ ‎financial ‎transactions.

Therefore,‏ ‎the ‎author ‎notes ‎that ‎it‏ ‎is ‎simply‏ ‎unfair‏ ‎that ‎Russia ‎has‏ ‎managed ‎to‏ ‎use ‎its ‎IT ‎ecosystem‏ ‎in‏ ‎the ‎interests‏ ‎of ‎various‏ ‎industries ‎within ‎the ‎country, ‎such‏ ‎as‏ ‎e-commerce, ‎financial‏ ‎services, ‎telecommunications,‏ ‎media ‎and ‎entertainment, ‎education ‎and‏ ‎healthcare.


Unpacking‏ ‎in‏ ‎more ‎detail

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Why Great Powers Launch Destructive Cyber Operations and What to Do About It

Here ‎we‏ ‎have ‎the ‎German ‎Council ‎on‏ ‎Foreign ‎Relations‏ ‎(DGAP),‏ ‎those ‎paragons ‎of‏ ‎geopolitical ‎insight,‏ ‎serving ‎up ‎a ‎dish‏ ‎of‏ ‎the ‎obvious‏ ‎with ‎a‏ ‎side ‎of ‎«tell ‎me ‎something‏ ‎I‏ ‎don’t ‎know»‏ ‎in ‎their‏ ‎publication ‎«Why ‎Great ‎Powers ‎Launch‏ ‎Destructive‏ ‎Cyber‏ ‎Operations ‎and‏ ‎What ‎to‏ ‎Do ‎About‏ ‎It.» It’s‏ ‎a ‎riveting‏ ‎tale ‎of ‎how ‎big, ‎bad‏ ‎countries ‎flex‏ ‎their‏ ‎digital ‎muscles ‎to‏ ‎wreak ‎havoc‏ ‎on ‎the ‎less ‎fortunate.‏ ‎And‏ ‎what’s ‎their‏ ‎groundbreaking ‎solution?‏ ‎Analyze, ‎predict, ‎and ‎strategize. ‎Groundbreaking,‏ ‎indeed.

The‏ ‎whole ‎DGAP‏ ‎article ‎looks‏ ‎like ‎a ‎story ‎about ‎a‏ ‎midlife‏ ‎crisis:‏ ‎with ‎the‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎aspects‏ ‎of ‎smart‏ ‎cities‏ ‎and ‎the‏ ‎existential ‎fear ‎of ‎technological ‎addiction.‏ ‎To ‎enhance‏ ‎the‏ ‎effect, ‎they ‎link‏ ‎cyberwarfare ‎and‏ ‎the ‎proliferation ‎of ‎weapons‏ ‎of‏ ‎mass ‎destruction‏ ‎and ‎here‏ ‎we ‎learn ‎that ‎great ‎powers‏ ‎launch‏ ‎cyberattacks ‎for‏ ‎the ‎same‏ ‎reasons ‎they ‎do ‎anything ‎else:‏ ‎power,‏ ‎money,‏ ‎other ‎things‏ ‎everyone ‎loves‏ ‎(obviously, ‎the‏ ‎author‏ ‎writes ‎knowledgeably).‏ ‎And ‎of ‎course, ‎the ‎author‏ ‎decided ‎to‏ ‎hype‏ ‎and ‎remind ‎about‏ ‎the ‎role‏ ‎of ‎machine ‎learning ‎in‏ ‎cyber‏ ‎operations.

Now, ‎let’s‏ ‎dive ‎into‏ ‎the ‎article’s ‎«comprehensive» ‎overview ‎of‏ ‎cybersecurity.‏ ‎The ‎author‏ ‎points ‎out‏ ‎the ‎good ‎(shiny ‎new ‎tech),‏ ‎the‏ ‎bad‏ ‎(those ‎pesky,‏ ‎persistent ‎threats),‏ ‎and ‎the‏ ‎ugly‏ ‎(criminal ‎organizations‏ ‎with ‎more ‎ambition ‎than ‎a‏ ‎Silicon ‎Valley‏ ‎startup).‏ ‎But ‎when ‎it‏ ‎comes ‎to‏ ‎the ‎negatives, ‎the ‎author‏ ‎tiptoes‏ ‎around ‎like‏ ‎they’re ‎trying‏ ‎not ‎to ‎wake ‎a ‎sleeping‏ ‎baby.

So‏ ‎there ‎you‏ ‎have ‎it,‏ ‎a ‎masterclass ‎in ‎stating ‎the‏ ‎obvious‏ ‎with‏ ‎a ‎dash‏ ‎of ‎sarcasm‏ ‎and ‎a‏ ‎sprinkle‏ ‎of ‎post-irony.‏ ‎Remember, ‎when ‎it ‎comes ‎to‏ ‎cyber ‎warfare,‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎not ‎about ‎the‏ ‎size ‎of‏ ‎your ‎digital ‎arsenal, ‎but‏ ‎how‏ ‎you ‎use‏ ‎it. ‎Or‏ ‎so ‎they ‎say.


Unpacking ‎in ‎more‏ ‎detail

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

«What China’s Rise to Innovation Power Teaches Us»

Do ‎you‏ ‎remember ‎when ‎the ‎West ‎laughed‏ ‎at ‎the‏ ‎mere‏ ‎thought ‎that ‎China‏ ‎was ‎a‏ ‎leader ‎in ‎innovation? ‎Well,‏ ‎the‏ ‎DGAP ‎article‏ ‎«Was ‎uns‏ ‎Chinas ‎Aufstieg ‎zur ‎Innovationsmacht ‎lehrt» is‏ ‎here‏ ‎to ‎remind‏ ‎you ‎that‏ ‎China ‎was ‎busy ‎not ‎only‏ ‎producing‏ ‎everything,‏ ‎but ‎also‏ ‎innovating, ‎giving‏ ‎Silicon ‎Valley‏ ‎the‏ ‎opportunity ‎to‏ ‎earn ‎its ‎money. ‎But, ‎there‏ ‎are ‎rumors‏ ‎about‏ ‎barriers ‎to ‎market‏ ‎entry ‎and‏ ‎slowing ‎economic ‎growth, ‎which‏ ‎may‏ ‎hinder ‎their‏ ‎parade ‎of‏ ‎innovations. ‎And ‎let’s ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎about‏ ‎the ‎espionage‏ ‎law, ‎because‏ ‎of ‎which ‎Western ‎companies ‎are‏ ‎shaking‏ ‎with‏ ‎fear, ‎too‏ ‎scared ‎to‏ ‎stick ‎their‏ ‎noses‏ ‎into ‎the‏ ‎Chinese ‎market, ‎or ‎because ‎they‏ ‎are ‎not‏ ‎really‏ ‎needed ‎in ‎this‏ ‎market ‎anymore?‏ ‎But ‎the ‎West ‎argues‏ ‎that‏ ‎despite ‎China’s‏ ‎grandiose ‎plans‏ ‎to ‎become ‎self-sufficient, ‎they ‎seem‏ ‎unable‏ ‎to ‎get‏ ‎rid ‎of‏ ‎their ‎dependence ‎on ‎Western ‎technology,‏ ‎especially‏ ‎these‏ ‎extremely ‎important‏ ‎semiconductors.

The ‎article‏ ‎notes ‎that‏ ‎China’s‏ ‎innovation ‎train‏ ‎has ‎not ‎yet ‎hit ‎a‏ ‎brick ‎wall‏ ‎—‏ ‎it ‎is ‎just‏ ‎waiting ‎for‏ ‎the ‎next ‎round ‎of‏ ‎political‏ ‎chess ‎moves‏ ‎from ‎both‏ ‎sides ‎of ‎the ‎globe. ‎The‏ ‎West‏ ‎is ‎scratching‏ ‎its ‎head,‏ ‎trying ‎to ‎figure ‎out ‎whether‏ ‎they‏ ‎should‏ ‎join ‎the‏ ‎party ‎or‏ ‎sulk ‎in‏ ‎the‏ ‎corner.

The ‎main‏ ‎conclusion: ‎China ‎is ‎showing ‎its‏ ‎muscles ‎as‏ ‎an‏ ‎economic ‎superpower, ‎and‏ ‎it ‎is‏ ‎no ‎longer ‎just ‎a‏ ‎toy‏ ‎and ‎clothing‏ ‎manufacturer. ‎They‏ ‎are ‎in ‎the ‎top ‎league‏ ‎in‏ ‎research ‎and‏ ‎development ‎and‏ ‎intellectual ‎property, ‎and ‎they ‎are‏ ‎aiming‏ ‎to‏ ‎win ‎in‏ ‎the ‎field‏ ‎of ‎military‏ ‎and‏ ‎security ‎technology.

As‏ ‎for ‎the ‎secondary ‎conclusions, ‎there‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎slowdown‏ ‎in ‎economic ‎growth,‏ ‎an ‎increase‏ ‎in ‎debt, ‎an ‎aging‏ ‎population‏ ‎that ‎is‏ ‎not ‎getting‏ ‎younger ‎for ‎some ‎reason, ‎and‏ ‎an‏ ‎environmental ‎mess‏ ‎that ‎spoils‏ ‎the ‎mood ‎for ‎everyone. ‎In‏ ‎addition,‏ ‎the‏ ‎global ‎marketplace‏ ‎is ‎getting‏ ‎tense, ‎and‏ ‎everyone‏ ‎from ‎Uncle‏ ‎Sam ‎to ‎Aunt ‎Angela ‎is‏ ‎watching ‎China’s‏ ‎every‏ ‎move.

After ‎all, ‎the‏ ‎episodic ‎role‏ ‎in ‎the ‎pandemic ‎and‏ ‎the‏ ‎geopolitical ‎plot‏ ‎twists ‎have‏ ‎shown ‎how ‎much ‎the ‎world‏ ‎relies‏ ‎on ‎China’s‏ ‎manufacturing ‎power.‏ ‎So ‎grab ‎your ‎3D ‎glasses‏ ‎—‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎going ‎to‏ ‎be ‎an‏ ‎interesting ‎show!


Unpacking‏ ‎in‏ ‎more ‎detail

Читать: 4+ мин
logo Snarky Security

The Sources of China’s Innovativeness

Buckle ‎up,‏ ‎because ‎we’re ‎about ‎to ‎embark‏ ‎on ‎a‏ ‎thrilling‏ ‎journey ‎through ‎the‏ ‎mystical ‎land‏ ‎of ‎China’s ‎innovation, where ‎the‏ ‎dragons‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎past ‎have‏ ‎morphed ‎into ‎the ‎unicorns ‎of‏ ‎the‏ ‎tech ‎world.‏ ‎Yes, ‎folks,‏ ‎we’re ‎talking ‎about ‎the ‎transformation‏ ‎of‏ ‎China‏ ‎from ‎the‏ ‎world’s ‎favorite‏ ‎Xerox ‎machine‏ ‎to‏ ‎the ‎shining‏ ‎beacon ‎of ‎innovation. ‎And ‎how‏ ‎did ‎they‏ ‎achieve‏ ‎this ‎miraculous ‎feat?

Behold,‏ ‎the ‎«Five‏ ‎Virtues» ‎of ‎China’s ‎Innovativeness,‏ ‎as‏ ‎if ‎plucked‏ ‎straight ‎from‏ ‎an ‎ancient ‎scroll ‎of ‎wisdom:

✴️The‏ ‎Art‏ ‎of ‎Market-Fu:‏ ‎First ‎up,‏ ‎we ‎have ‎the ‎masterful ‎use‏ ‎of‏ ‎protectionism,‏ ‎where ‎China‏ ‎has ‎turned‏ ‎its ‎market‏ ‎into‏ ‎a ‎fortress,‏ ‎selectively ‎lowering ‎the ‎drawbridge ‎for‏ ‎Western ‎trends‏ ‎while‏ ‎ensuring ‎their ‎tech‏ ‎toddlers ‎are‏ ‎safe ‎from ‎the ‎barbarians‏ ‎at‏ ‎the ‎gates.‏ ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎saying, ‎«Thanks ‎for ‎the ‎ideas,‏ ‎we’ll‏ ‎take ‎it‏ ‎from ‎here!»

✴️The‏ ‎Great ‎Knowledge ‎Magnet: ‎In ‎an‏ ‎astonishing‏ ‎turn‏ ‎of ‎events,‏ ‎China ‎has‏ ‎been ‎attracting‏ ‎knowledge‏ ‎and ‎technology‏ ‎like ‎bees ‎to ‎honey. ‎Or‏ ‎should ‎we‏ ‎say,‏ ‎like ‎techies ‎to‏ ‎free ‎Wi-Fi?‏ ‎They’ve ‎rolled ‎out ‎the‏ ‎red‏ ‎carpet ‎for‏ ‎returning ‎scientists‏ ‎and ‎tech ‎transfers, ‎because ‎why‏ ‎invent‏ ‎the ‎wheel‏ ‎when ‎you‏ ‎can ‎just ‎import ‎it?

✴️Friends ‎with‏ ‎Benefits:‏ ‎Despite‏ ‎chanting ‎the‏ ‎self-reliance ‎mantra‏ ‎every ‎morning,‏ ‎China‏ ‎has ‎been‏ ‎sliding ‎into ‎the ‎DMs ‎of‏ ‎Western ‎tech‏ ‎firms‏ ‎and ‎universities, ‎forming‏ ‎alliances ‎that‏ ‎would ‎make ‎even ‎the‏ ‎most‏ ‎seasoned ‎diplomats‏ ‎blush. ‎«Let’s‏ ‎collaborate, ‎but ‎also, ‎I’ll ‎take‏ ‎some‏ ‎of ‎that‏ ‎cutting-edge ‎tech‏ ‎you ‎have ‎there.»

✴️The ‎Benevolent ‎Overlord:‏ ‎Moving‏ ‎on,‏ ‎we ‎have‏ ‎the ‎party-state‏ ‎playing ‎the‏ ‎role‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎wise ‎old ‎sage, ‎guiding ‎the‏ ‎economy ‎with‏ ‎a‏ ‎gentle ‎hand ‎rather‏ ‎than ‎ruling‏ ‎with ‎an ‎iron ‎fist.‏ ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎the‏ ‎government ‎saying,‏ ‎«We ‎trust ‎you, ‎but ‎remember,‏ ‎Big‏ ‎Brother ‎is‏ ‎always ‎watching.»

✴️Survival‏ ‎of ‎the ‎Fittest, ‎with ‎Chinese‏ ‎Characteristics:‏ ‎And‏ ‎finally, ‎the‏ ‎gladiatorial ‎arena‏ ‎of ‎domestic‏ ‎competition,‏ ‎where ‎state-owned‏ ‎enterprises ‎and ‎plucky ‎startups ‎duke‏ ‎it ‎out‏ ‎in‏ ‎a ‎battle ‎royale‏ ‎for ‎market‏ ‎dominance. ‎It’s ‎capitalism, ‎but‏ ‎with‏ ‎a ‎dash‏ ‎of ‎socialism‏ ‎for ‎flavor.

Now, ‎the ‎West ‎is‏ ‎sitting‏ ‎on ‎the‏ ‎sidelines, ‎wringing‏ ‎its ‎hands ‎and ‎wondering, ‎«Should‏ ‎we‏ ‎jump‏ ‎on ‎this‏ ‎bandwagon ‎or‏ ‎stick ‎to‏ ‎our‏ ‎own ‎playbook?»‏ ‎It ‎turns ‎out ‎the ‎West‏ ‎hasn’t ‎been‏ ‎completely‏ ‎outmaneuvered ‎just ‎yet‏ ‎and ‎still‏ ‎holds ‎a ‎few ‎cards‏ ‎up‏ ‎its ‎sleeve.‏ ‎The ‎articles‏ ‎preach ‎that ‎imitation ‎is ‎not‏ ‎the‏ ‎sincerest ‎form‏ ‎of ‎flattery‏ ‎in ‎this ‎case. ‎Instead, ‎the‏ ‎West‏ ‎should‏ ‎flex ‎its‏ ‎democratic ‎muscles‏ ‎and ‎free-market‏ ‎flair‏ ‎to ‎stay‏ ‎in ‎the ‎game.


Unpacking ‎in ‎more‏ ‎detail

Читать: 6+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Patent US20220232015A1 / Preventing cloud-based phishing attacks using shared documents with malicious links

Another ‎patent‏ ‎that ‎promises ‎to ‎revolutionize ‎the‏ ‎thrilling ‎world‏ ‎of‏ ‎network ‎security ‎with‏ ‎US20220232015A1. Brace ‎yourselves‏ ‎for ‎a ‎riveting ‎tale‏ ‎of‏ ‎inline ‎proxies,‏ ‎synthetic ‎requests,‏ ‎and ‎the ‎ever-so-captivating ‎inline ‎metadata‏ ‎generation‏ ‎logic. ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎the‏ ‎Avengers, ‎but ‎instead ‎of ‎superheroes,‏ ‎we‏ ‎have‏ ‎network ‎security‏ ‎components ‎saving‏ ‎the ‎day.

It’s‏ ‎essentially‏ ‎a ‎glorified‏ ‎bouncer ‎for ‎your ‎corporate ‎network,‏ ‎deciding ‎which‏ ‎document‏ ‎files ‎get ‎to‏ ‎strut ‎down‏ ‎the ‎digital ‎red ‎carpet‏ ‎and‏ ‎which ‎ones‏ ‎get ‎the‏ ‎boot. ‎This ‎system, ‎armed ‎with‏ ‎an‏ ‎inline ‎proxy‏ ‎(because ‎apparently,‏ ‎«inline» ‎makes ‎anything ‎sound ‎more‏ ‎tech-savvy),‏ ‎stands‏ ‎guard ‎between‏ ‎the ‎cloud‏ ‎and ‎the‏ ‎corporate‏ ‎network ‎like‏ ‎a ‎knight ‎in ‎shining ‎armor—except‏ ‎it’s ‎fighting‏ ‎off‏ ‎data ‎packets ‎instead‏ ‎of ‎dragons.

This‏ ‎system ‎doesn’t ‎just ‎blindly‏ ‎swing‏ ‎its ‎sword‏ ‎at ‎anything‏ ‎that ‎moves. ‎Oh ‎no, ‎it’s‏ ‎got‏ ‎finesse. ‎It‏ ‎identifies ‎document‏ ‎files ‎trying ‎to ‎sneak ‎into‏ ‎the‏ ‎corporate‏ ‎network ‎using‏ ‎«various ‎methods‏ ‎and ‎metadata,‏ ‎»‏ ‎which ‎is‏ ‎a ‎fancy ‎way ‎of ‎saying‏ ‎it’s ‎really‏ ‎nosy‏ ‎and ‎likes ‎to‏ ‎snoop ‎around.‏ ‎And ‎then, ‎like ‎a‏ ‎judgy‏ ‎gatekeeper, ‎it‏ ‎categorizes ‎these‏ ‎documents ‎into ‎three ‎cliques: ‎the‏ ‎sanctioned‏ ‎(the ‎cool‏ ‎kids ‎allowed‏ ‎in ‎without ‎a ‎fuss), ‎the‏ ‎blacklisted‏ ‎(the‏ ‎troublemakers ‎permanently‏ ‎exiled ‎to‏ ‎the ‎land‏ ‎of‏ ‎«Access ‎Denied»),‏ ‎and ‎the ‎unknown ‎(the ‎mysterious‏ ‎strangers ‎who‏ ‎need‏ ‎a ‎thorough ‎background‏ ‎check).

The ‎patent‏ ‎goes ‎on ‎to ‎wax‏ ‎poetic‏ ‎about ‎the‏ ‎use ‎of‏ ‎policy-based ‎rules, ‎threat ‎scanning, ‎and‏ ‎sandboxing‏ ‎for ‎those‏ ‎unknown ‎or‏ ‎potentially ‎malicious ‎documents. ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎says‏ ‎«cutting-edge‏ ‎technology» ‎like‏ ‎treating ‎every‏ ‎document ‎like‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎a ‎ticking‏ ‎time ‎bomb.


Let’s ‎dive ‎into ‎this‏ ‎page-turner, ‎shall‏ ‎we?

First‏ ‎off, ‎we ‎have‏ ‎the ‎«Network‏ ‎Security ‎System, ‎» ‎a‏ ‎groundbreaking‏ ‎invention ‎that—hold‏ ‎your ‎applause—acts‏ ‎as ‎a ‎middleman ‎between ‎clients‏ ‎and‏ ‎cloud ‎applications.‏ ‎Because ‎if‏ ‎there’s ‎anything ‎we ‎need, ‎it’s‏ ‎more‏ ‎intermediaries‏ ‎in ‎our‏ ‎lives, ‎right?‏ ‎This ‎system‏ ‎is‏ ‎so ‎dedicated‏ ‎to ‎enhancing ‎security ‎in ‎cloud-based‏ ‎environments ‎that‏ ‎it‏ ‎practically ‎wears ‎a‏ ‎cape.

Next ‎up,‏ ‎«Synthetic ‎Request ‎Generation.» ‎The‏ ‎system‏ ‎doesn’t ‎just‏ ‎handle ‎requests;‏ ‎oh ‎no, ‎it ‎creates ‎its‏ ‎own.‏ ‎Because ‎why‏ ‎wait ‎for‏ ‎trouble ‎when ‎you ‎can ‎conjure‏ ‎it‏ ‎up‏ ‎yourself? ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎inviting‏ ‎a ‎vampire‏ ‎into‏ ‎your ‎house‏ ‎just ‎to ‎see ‎if ‎your‏ ‎garlic ‎wreath‏ ‎works.

And‏ ‎let’s ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎the ‎«Inline‏ ‎Metadata ‎Generation ‎Logic.» ‎This‏ ‎isn’t‏ ‎just ‎any‏ ‎logic; ‎it’s‏ ‎inline, ‎which ‎means… ‎something ‎very‏ ‎important,‏ ‎no ‎doubt.‏ ‎It’s ‎configured‏ ‎to ‎issue ‎synthetic ‎requests, ‎adding‏ ‎an‏ ‎extra‏ ‎layer ‎of‏ ‎complexity ‎because,‏ ‎clearly, ‎what‏ ‎our‏ ‎lives ‎lack‏ ‎is ‎complexity.

Then ‎there’s ‎the ‎«Separate‏ ‎Synthetic ‎Requests.»‏ ‎Because‏ ‎why ‎have ‎one‏ ‎type ‎of‏ ‎synthetic ‎request ‎when ‎you‏ ‎can‏ ‎have ‎two?‏ ‎Variety ‎is‏ ‎the ‎spice ‎of ‎life, ‎after‏ ‎all.‏ ‎This ‎technology‏ ‎is ‎like‏ ‎having ‎a ‎decoy ‎duck ‎in‏ ‎a‏ ‎pond‏ ‎full ‎of‏ ‎real ‎ducks,‏ ‎except ‎the‏ ‎ducks‏ ‎are ‎data,‏ ‎and ‎no ‎one’s ‎really ‎sure‏ ‎why ‎we‏ ‎need‏ ‎the ‎decoy ‎in‏ ‎the ‎first‏ ‎place.

Ah, ‎«Cloud ‎Policy ‎Enforcement,‏ ‎»‏ ‎the ‎pièce‏ ‎de ‎résistance.‏ ‎The ‎synthetic ‎request ‎injection ‎is‏ ‎used‏ ‎to ‎retrieve‏ ‎metadata ‎for‏ ‎cloud ‎policy ‎enforcement, ‎suggesting ‎that,‏ ‎yes,‏ ‎we‏ ‎can ‎enforce‏ ‎policies ‎in‏ ‎cloud ‎applications.‏ ‎Because‏ ‎if ‎there’s‏ ‎one ‎thing ‎cloud ‎applications ‎were‏ ‎missing, ‎it‏ ‎was‏ ‎more ‎policies.


Now, ‎for‏ ‎the ‎grand‏ ‎finale: ‎the ‎benefits ‎and‏ ‎drawbacks.

Benefits:

🗣"Enhanced‏ ‎Security»: ‎Because‏ ‎before ‎this‏ ‎patent, ‎everyone ‎was ‎just ‎winging‏ ‎it.

🗣"Proactive‏ ‎Threat ‎Detection»:‏ ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎Minority ‎Report ‎for ‎your ‎network,‏ ‎but‏ ‎without‏ ‎Tom ‎Cruise.

🗣"Dynamic‏ ‎Policy ‎Enforcement»:‏ ‎Finally, ‎a‏ ‎way‏ ‎to ‎enforce‏ ‎those ‎policies ‎dynamically. ‎Static ‎policy‏ ‎enforcement ‎is‏ ‎so‏ ‎2020.

🗣"Efficiency»: ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎says ‎efficiency‏ ‎like ‎generating ‎synthetic ‎requests‏ ‎to‏ ‎test ‎your‏ ‎own ‎system.

🗣"Stability‏ ‎and ‎Consistency»: ‎Because ‎if ‎there’s‏ ‎one‏ ‎thing ‎we‏ ‎crave ‎in‏ ‎the ‎fast-paced ‎world ‎of ‎IT,‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎stability.‏ ‎Yawn.

Drawbacks:

🗣"Complexity»: ‎Who‏ ‎would’ve ‎thought‏ ‎adding ‎several‏ ‎layers‏ ‎of ‎synthetic‏ ‎requests ‎and ‎metadata ‎logic ‎would‏ ‎make ‎things‏ ‎more‏ ‎complex?

🗣"False ‎Positives/Negatives»: ‎Surprise!‏ ‎The ‎system‏ ‎that ‎invents ‎its ‎own‏ ‎problems‏ ‎sometimes ‎gets‏ ‎it ‎wrong.

🗣"Maintenance‏ ‎and ‎Updates»: ‎Because ‎the ‎one‏ ‎thing‏ ‎IT ‎departments‏ ‎complain ‎about‏ ‎not ‎having ‎enough ‎of ‎is‏ ‎maintenance‏ ‎work.

🗣"User‏ ‎Experience ‎Impact»:‏ ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎enhances ‎user‏ ‎experience‏ ‎quite ‎like‏ ‎being ‎told ‎your ‎legitimate ‎document‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎security‏ ‎threat.

🗣"Over-Reliance ‎on ‎Known‏ ‎Threats»: ‎Because‏ ‎who ‎needs ‎to ‎worry‏ ‎about‏ ‎unknown ‎threats‏ ‎when ‎you‏ ‎can ‎just ‎keep ‎focusing ‎on‏ ‎the‏ ‎ones ‎you‏ ‎already ‎know?


So‏ ‎there ‎you ‎have ‎it, ‎folks.‏ ‎Patent‏ ‎US20220232015A1‏ ‎is ‎set‏ ‎to ‎revolutionize‏ ‎the ‎way‏ ‎we‏ ‎think ‎about‏ ‎network ‎security, ‎turning ‎the ‎mundane‏ ‎task ‎of‏ ‎document‏ ‎file ‎management ‎into‏ ‎a ‎saga‏ ‎worthy ‎of ‎its ‎own‏ ‎epic‏ ‎trilogy. ‎Move‏ ‎over, ‎Lord‏ ‎of ‎the ‎Rings; ‎there’s ‎a‏ ‎new‏ ‎tale ‎of‏ ‎adventure ‎in‏ ‎town, ‎complete ‎with ‎inline ‎proxies,‏ ‎metadata,‏ ‎and‏ ‎the ‎ever-thrilling‏ ‎sandboxing. ‎Who‏ ‎knew ‎network‏ ‎security‏ ‎could ‎be‏ ‎so… ‎exhilarating?


Unpacking ‎in ‎more ‎detail

Читать: 1+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Weekend humor / don’t be an infosec racist

Military-grade ‎security

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

CYBSAFE-Oh, Behave! 2023-FINAL REPORT

The ‎document‏ ‎«CYBSAFE-Oh, ‎Behave! ‎2023-FINAL ‎REPORT» is ‎a‏ ‎rather ‎enlightening‏ ‎(and‏ ‎somewhat ‎amusing) ‎exploration‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎current ‎state ‎of ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎awareness,‏ ‎attitudes, ‎and‏ ‎behaviors ‎among‏ ‎internet ‎users. ‎The ‎report, ‎with‏ ‎a‏ ‎touch ‎of‏ ‎irony, ‎reveals‏ ‎that ‎while ‎most ‎people ‎are‏ ‎aware‏ ‎of‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎risks,‏ ‎they ‎don’t‏ ‎always ‎take‏ ‎the‏ ‎necessary ‎steps‏ ‎to ‎protect ‎themselves. ‎For ‎instance,‏ ‎only ‎60%‏ ‎use‏ ‎strong ‎passwords, ‎and‏ ‎a ‎mere‏ ‎40% ‎use ‎multi-factor ‎authentication‏ ‎(MFA).‏ ‎Despite ‎being‏ ‎aware ‎of‏ ‎phishing ‎scams, ‎many ‎still ‎fall‏ ‎for‏ ‎them, ‎which‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎bit ‎like ‎knowing ‎the ‎stove‏ ‎is‏ ‎hot‏ ‎but ‎touching‏ ‎it ‎anyway.

The‏ ‎report ‎also‏ ‎highlights‏ ‎some ‎generational‏ ‎differences ‎in ‎attitudes ‎and ‎behaviors‏ ‎towards ‎cybersecurity.‏ ‎Younger‏ ‎generations, ‎such ‎as‏ ‎Gen ‎Z‏ ‎and ‎Millennials, ‎are ‎more‏ ‎digitally‏ ‎connected ‎but‏ ‎also ‎exhibit‏ ‎riskier ‎password ‎practices ‎and ‎are‏ ‎more‏ ‎skeptical ‎about‏ ‎the ‎value‏ ‎of ‎online ‎security ‎efforts. ‎It’s‏ ‎a‏ ‎bit‏ ‎like ‎giving‏ ‎a ‎teenager‏ ‎the ‎keys‏ ‎to‏ ‎a ‎sports‏ ‎car ‎and ‎expecting ‎them ‎not‏ ‎to ‎speed.

The‏ ‎media’s‏ ‎role ‎in ‎shaping‏ ‎people’s ‎views‏ ‎towards ‎online ‎security ‎is‏ ‎also‏ ‎discussed. ‎While‏ ‎it ‎motivates‏ ‎some ‎to ‎take ‎protective ‎actions‏ ‎and‏ ‎stay ‎informed,‏ ‎others ‎feel‏ ‎that ‎it ‎evokes ‎fear ‎and‏ ‎overcomplicates‏ ‎security‏ ‎matters. ‎It’s‏ ‎a ‎bit‏ ‎like ‎watching‏ ‎a‏ ‎horror ‎movie‏ ‎to ‎learn ‎about ‎home ‎security.

The‏ ‎report ‎also‏ ‎delves‏ ‎into ‎the ‎effectiveness‏ ‎of ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎training, ‎with ‎only ‎26%‏ ‎of‏ ‎participants ‎having‏ ‎access ‎to‏ ‎and ‎taking ‎advantage ‎of ‎such‏ ‎training.‏ ‎It’s ‎a‏ ‎bit ‎like‏ ‎having ‎a ‎gym ‎membership ‎but‏ ‎only‏ ‎going‏ ‎once ‎a‏ ‎month.

In ‎a‏ ‎nutshell, ‎the‏ ‎report‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎comprehensive ‎analysis ‎of ‎the ‎current‏ ‎state ‎of‏ ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎awareness, ‎attitudes, ‎and‏ ‎behaviors ‎among‏ ‎internet ‎users, ‎with ‎a‏ ‎healthy‏ ‎dose ‎of‏ ‎irony ‎and‏ ‎a ‎touch ‎of ‎sarcasm. ‎It’s‏ ‎a‏ ‎bit ‎like‏ ‎a ‎reality‏ ‎check, ‎served ‎with ‎a ‎side‏ ‎of‏ ‎humor.


Unpacking‏ ‎in ‎more‏ ‎detail

Читать: 6+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Risk-Based Approach to Vulnerability Prioritization by Health-ISAC

The ‎main‏ ‎focus ‎of ‎the ‎paper, ‎«Health-ISAC:‏ ‎Risk-Based ‎Approach‏ ‎to‏ ‎Vulnerability ‎Prioritization, ‎» is‏ ‎to ‎advocate‏ ‎for ‎a ‎more ‎nuanced‏ ‎and‏ ‎risk-based ‎approach‏ ‎to ‎the‏ ‎Sisyphean ‎task ‎of ‎vulnerability ‎management.‏ ‎In‏ ‎a ‎world‏ ‎where ‎the‏ ‎number ‎of ‎vulnerabilities ‎is ‎so‏ ‎high‏ ‎that‏ ‎it ‎could‏ ‎give ‎anyone‏ ‎trying ‎to‏ ‎patch‏ ‎them ‎all‏ ‎a ‎Sysadmin ‎version ‎of ‎a‏ ‎nervous ‎breakdown,‏ ‎the‏ ‎paper ‎wryly ‎suggests‏ ‎that ‎maybe,‏ ‎just ‎maybe, ‎we ‎should‏ ‎focus‏ ‎on ‎the‏ ‎ones ‎that‏ ‎bad ‎actors ‎are ‎actually ‎exploiting‏ ‎in‏ ‎the ‎wild.‏ ‎It’s ‎a‏ ‎radical ‎thought—prioritizing ‎based ‎on ‎actual‏ ‎risk‏ ‎rather‏ ‎than ‎just‏ ‎running ‎around‏ ‎like ‎headless‏ ‎man‏ ‎trying ‎to‏ ‎address ‎a ‎CVSS ‎score ‎while‏ ‎apocalyptic ‎cats‏ ‎are‏ ‎falling ‎from ‎the‏ ‎sky.

The ‎document,‏ ‎with ‎a ‎hint ‎of‏ ‎black‏ ‎humor, ‎acknowledges‏ ‎the ‎absurdity‏ ‎of ‎the ‎traditional ‎«patch ‎everything‏ ‎yesterday»‏ ‎approach, ‎given‏ ‎that ‎only‏ ‎a ‎minuscule ‎2-7% ‎of ‎published‏ ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎are‏ ‎ever ‎exploited.‏ ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎preparing ‎for‏ ‎every‏ ‎possible ‎natural‏ ‎disaster ‎every ‎day, ‎instead ‎of‏ ‎just ‎the‏ ‎ones‏ ‎that ‎are ‎likely‏ ‎to ‎hit‏ ‎your ‎area. ‎The ‎paper‏ ‎introduces‏ ‎a ‎cast‏ ‎of ‎characters‏ ‎in ‎the ‎form ‎of ‎frameworks‏ ‎and‏ ‎scoring ‎systems—such‏ ‎as ‎the‏ ‎EPSS ‎and ‎SSVC—that ‎are ‎designed‏ ‎to‏ ‎help‏ ‎organizations ‎make‏ ‎sense ‎of‏ ‎the ‎vulnerability‏ ‎chaos‏ ‎with ‎the‏ ‎precision ‎of ‎a ‎surgeon ‎rather‏ ‎than ‎the‏ ‎blunt‏ ‎force ‎of ‎a‏ ‎sledgehammer.

In ‎essence,‏ ‎the ‎paper ‎is ‎a‏ ‎call‏ ‎to ‎arms‏ ‎for ‎organizations‏ ‎to ‎stop ‎playing ‎whack-a-mole ‎with‏ ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎and ‎instead‏ ‎adopt ‎a‏ ‎more ‎strategic, ‎targeted ‎approach ‎that‏ ‎considers‏ ‎factors‏ ‎like ‎the‏ ‎actual ‎exploitability‏ ‎of ‎a‏ ‎vulnerability,‏ ‎the ‎value‏ ‎of ‎the ‎asset ‎at ‎risk,‏ ‎and ‎whether‏ ‎the‏ ‎vulnerability ‎is ‎lounging‏ ‎around ‎on‏ ‎the ‎internet ‎or ‎hiding‏ ‎behind‏ ‎layers ‎of‏ ‎security ‎controls.‏ ‎It’s ‎about ‎working ‎smarter, ‎not‏ ‎harder,‏ ‎in ‎the‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎equivalent‏ ‎of ‎an ‎endless ‎game ‎of‏ ‎Tetris‏ ‎where‏ ‎the ‎blocks‏ ‎just ‎keep‏ ‎coming ‎faster‏ ‎and‏ ‎faster.

Key ‎findings

So,‏ ‎let’s ‎dive ‎into ‎the ‎thrilling‏ ‎world ‎of‏ ‎vulnerability‏ ‎management. ‎If ‎you’re‏ ‎a ‎fledgling‏ ‎organization, ‎you ‎might ‎be‏ ‎tempted‏ ‎to ‎remediate‏ ‎all ‎critical‏ ‎and ‎high ‎severity ‎vulnerabilities ‎using‏ ‎the‏ ‎scoring ‎system‏ ‎within ‎your‏ ‎chosen ‎vulnerability ‎scanning ‎tool. ‎It’s‏ ‎like‏ ‎trying‏ ‎to ‎buy‏ ‎the ‎entire‏ ‎stock ‎market‏ ‎in‏ ‎an ‎attempt‏ ‎to ‎diversify.

Wait, ‎there’s ‎a ‎catch!‏ ‎This ‎approach‏ ‎might‏ ‎just ‎overwhelm ‎your‏ ‎remediation ‎teams‏ ‎with ‎the ‎sheer ‎number‏ ‎of‏ ‎vulnerabilities ‎they‏ ‎have ‎to‏ ‎focus ‎on. ‎It’s ‎like ‎asking‏ ‎someone‏ ‎to ‎count‏ ‎all ‎the‏ ‎grains ‎of ‎sand ‎on ‎a‏ ‎beach.‏ ‎And‏ ‎let’s ‎not‏ ‎forget, ‎those‏ ‎sneaky ‎threat‏ ‎actors‏ ‎might ‎not‏ ‎always ‎exploit ‎the ‎highest ‎severity‏ ‎vulnerabilities. ‎Instead,‏ ‎they‏ ‎might ‎chain ‎together‏ ‎multiple ‎exploits‏ ‎of ‎less ‎severe ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎to‏ ‎gain ‎access‏ ‎to ‎systems

Now,‏ ‎if ‎you’re ‎feeling ‎adventurous, ‎you‏ ‎might‏ ‎want ‎to‏ ‎focus ‎on‏ ‎known ‎exploited ‎vulnerabilities. ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎playing‏ ‎whack-a-mole,‏ ‎but ‎instead‏ ‎of ‎moles,‏ ‎you’re ‎dealing‏ ‎with‏ ‎actual ‎threats.‏ ‎This ‎approach ‎significantly ‎reduces ‎the‏ ‎number ‎of‏ ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎that ‎need ‎immediate‏ ‎attention ‎and‏ ‎ensures ‎practitioners ‎focus ‎on‏ ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎that ‎pose‏ ‎the ‎greatest‏ ‎threat ‎to ‎organizations

Now, ‎it ‎gets‏ ‎even‏ ‎more ‎exciting!‏ ‎You ‎also‏ ‎need ‎to ‎consider ‎the ‎network‏ ‎location‏ ‎of‏ ‎your ‎vulnerabilities.‏ ‎Internet-facing ‎vulnerabilities‏ ‎and ‎misconfigurations‏ ‎should‏ ‎always ‎be‏ ‎a ‎priority ‎since ‎they’re ‎like‏ ‎a ‎neon‏ ‎sign‏ ‎inviting ‎threat ‎actors‏ ‎to ‎come‏ ‎and ‎play. ‎For ‎systems‏ ‎that‏ ‎are ‎internally‏ ‎facing ‎or‏ ‎not ‎accessible ‎from ‎the ‎internet,‏ ‎these‏ ‎should ‎fall‏ ‎under ‎an‏ ‎internal ‎service ‎level ‎agreement ‎(SLA)‏ ‎remediation‏ ‎timeline

And‏ ‎let’s ‎not‏ ‎forget ‎about‏ ‎asset ‎value.‏ ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎playing‏ ‎a ‎game ‎of ‎Monopoly, ‎but‏ ‎instead ‎of‏ ‎properties,‏ ‎you’re ‎dealing ‎with‏ ‎your ‎organization’s‏ ‎assets. ‎If ‎a ‎device‏ ‎that‏ ‎is ‎of‏ ‎the ‎utmost‏ ‎importance ‎to ‎the ‎operation ‎of‏ ‎the‏ ‎business ‎or‏ ‎holds ‎critical‏ ‎information ‎were ‎to ‎be ‎compromised,‏ ‎it‏ ‎could‏ ‎be ‎catastrophic‏ ‎to ‎the‏ ‎organization

But ‎wait,‏ ‎there’s‏ ‎more! ‎You‏ ‎also ‎have ‎to ‎consider ‎compensating‏ ‎controls. ‎These‏ ‎are‏ ‎like ‎your ‎organization’s‏ ‎security ‎bodyguards,‏ ‎making ‎it ‎more ‎difficult‏ ‎to‏ ‎exploit ‎vulnerabilities.‏ ‎However, ‎changing‏ ‎a ‎vulnerability’s ‎severity ‎or ‎risk‏ ‎rating‏ ‎without ‎sufficient‏ ‎data ‎to‏ ‎support ‎the ‎change ‎can ‎cause‏ ‎teams‏ ‎to‏ ‎focus ‎on‏ ‎the ‎wrong‏ ‎vulnerabilities ‎and‏ ‎weaken‏ ‎an ‎organization’s‏ ‎security ‎posture

Finally, ‎we ‎have ‎the‏ ‎Exploit ‎Prediction‏ ‎Scoring‏ ‎System ‎(EPSS) ‎and‏ ‎Stakeholder-Specific ‎Vulnerability‏ ‎Categorization ‎(SSVC). ‎EPSS ‎is‏ ‎like‏ ‎a ‎crystal‏ ‎ball, ‎predicting‏ ‎the ‎likelihood ‎or ‎probability ‎that‏ ‎a‏ ‎vulnerability ‎will‏ ‎be ‎exploited‏ ‎in ‎the ‎wild. ‎SSVC, ‎on‏ ‎the‏ ‎other‏ ‎hand, ‎is‏ ‎like ‎a‏ ‎personalized ‎roadmap,‏ ‎focusing‏ ‎on ‎values,‏ ‎including ‎the ‎security ‎flaw’s ‎exploitation‏ ‎status, ‎its‏ ‎impact‏ ‎on ‎safety, ‎and‏ ‎the ‎prevalence‏ ‎of ‎the ‎affected ‎products

So‏ ‎there‏ ‎you ‎have‏ ‎it, ‎the‏ ‎rollercoaster ‎ride ‎that ‎is ‎CVSS‏ ‎scoring.‏ ‎It’s ‎a‏ ‎wild ‎ride,‏ ‎but ‎with ‎the ‎right ‎approach,‏ ‎you‏ ‎can‏ ‎navigate ‎the‏ ‎twists ‎and‏ ‎turns ‎and‏ ‎keep‏ ‎your ‎organization‏ ‎safe ‎from ‎those ‎pesky ‎vulnerabilities.


Unpacking‏ ‎in ‎more‏ ‎detail

Читать: 8+ мин
logo Snarky Security

«Navigating the Maze of Incident Response» by Microsoft Security

The ‎document‏ ‎titled ‎«Navigating ‎the ‎Maze ‎of‏ ‎Incident ‎Response»‏ ‎by‏ ‎Microsoft ‎Security provides ‎a‏ ‎guide ‎on‏ ‎how ‎to ‎structure ‎an‏ ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎(IR)‏ ‎effectively. ‎It‏ ‎emphasizes ‎the ‎importance ‎of ‎people‏ ‎and‏ ‎processes ‎in‏ ‎responding ‎to‏ ‎a ‎cybersecurity ‎incident.

So, ‎here’s ‎the‏ ‎deal:‏ ‎cyber‏ ‎security ‎incidents‏ ‎are ‎as‏ ‎inevitable ‎as‏ ‎your‏ ‎phone ‎battery‏ ‎dying ‎at ‎the ‎most ‎inconvenient‏ ‎time. ‎And‏ ‎just‏ ‎like ‎you ‎need‏ ‎a ‎plan‏ ‎for ‎when ‎your ‎phone‏ ‎kicks‏ ‎the ‎bucket‏ ‎(buy ‎a‏ ‎power ‎bank, ‎maybe?), ‎you ‎need‏ ‎a‏ ‎plan ‎for‏ ‎when ‎cyber‏ ‎incidents ‎occur. ‎This ‎guide ‎is‏ ‎all‏ ‎about‏ ‎that ‎plan,‏ ‎focusing ‎on‏ ‎the ‎people‏ ‎and‏ ‎processes ‎involved‏ ‎in ‎effectively ‎responding ‎to ‎an‏ ‎incident.

Now, ‎as‏ ‎enterprise‏ ‎networks ‎grow ‎in‏ ‎size ‎and‏ ‎complexity, ‎securing ‎them ‎becomes‏ ‎as‏ ‎challenging ‎as‏ ‎finding ‎a‏ ‎needle ‎in ‎a ‎haystack. ‎The‏ ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎process‏ ‎becomes ‎a‏ ‎maze ‎that ‎security ‎professionals ‎must‏ ‎navigate‏ ‎(and‏ ‎only ‎a‏ ‎quarter ‎of‏ ‎organizations ‎have‏ ‎an‏ ‎incident ‎response‏ ‎plan, ‎and ‎you ‎are ‎not‏ ‎yet ‎one‏ ‎of‏ ‎them).

This ‎guide, ‎developed‏ ‎by ‎the‏ ‎Microsoft ‎Incident ‎Response ‎team,‏ ‎is‏ ‎designed ‎to‏ ‎help ‎you‏ ‎avoid ‎common ‎pitfalls ‎during ‎the‏ ‎outset‏ ‎of ‎a‏ ‎response. ‎It’s‏ ‎not ‎meant ‎to ‎replace ‎comprehensive‏ ‎incident‏ ‎response‏ ‎planning, ‎but‏ ‎rather ‎to‏ ‎serve ‎as‏ ‎a‏ ‎tactical ‎guide‏ ‎to ‎help ‎both ‎security ‎teams‏ ‎and ‎senior‏ ‎stakeholders‏ ‎navigate ‎an ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎investigation.

The‏ ‎guide ‎also ‎outlines ‎the‏ ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎lifecycle,‏ ‎which ‎includes‏ ‎preparation, ‎detection, ‎containment, ‎eradication, ‎recovery,‏ ‎and‏ ‎post-incident ‎activity‏ ‎or ‎lessons‏ ‎learned. ‎It’s ‎like ‎a ‎recipe‏ ‎for‏ ‎disaster‏ ‎management, ‎with‏ ‎each ‎step‏ ‎as ‎crucial‏ ‎as‏ ‎the ‎next.

The‏ ‎guide ‎also ‎emphasizes ‎the ‎importance‏ ‎of ‎governance‏ ‎and‏ ‎the ‎roles ‎of‏ ‎different ‎stakeholders‏ ‎in ‎the ‎incident ‎response‏ ‎process.‏ ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎a ‎well-oiled‏ ‎machine, ‎with ‎each ‎part ‎playing‏ ‎a‏ ‎crucial ‎role‏ ‎in ‎the‏ ‎overall ‎function.

Here ‎are ‎key ‎points:

❇️Cybersecurity‏ ‎incidents‏ ‎are‏ ‎inevitable: ‎The‏ ‎document ‎starts‏ ‎with ‎the‏ ‎groundbreaking‏ ‎revelation ‎that‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎incidents ‎are, ‎in ‎fact,‏ ‎inevitable. ‎Who‏ ‎would‏ ‎have ‎thought? ‎It’s‏ ‎almost ‎as‏ ‎if ‎we ‎live ‎in‏ ‎a‏ ‎world ‎where‏ ‎cyber ‎threats‏ ‎are ‎a ‎daily ‎occurrence

❇️Only ‎26%‏ ‎of‏ ‎organizations ‎have‏ ‎a ‎consistently‏ ‎applied ‎IR ‎plan: ‎The ‎document‏ ‎cites‏ ‎an‏ ‎IBM ‎study‏ ‎that ‎found‏ ‎only ‎26%‏ ‎of‏ ‎organizations ‎have‏ ‎an ‎incident ‎response ‎plan ‎that‏ ‎is ‎consistently‏ ‎applied.‏ ‎It’s ‎comforting ‎to‏ ‎know ‎that‏ ‎nearly ‎three-quarters ‎of ‎organizations‏ ‎are‏ ‎have ‎decided‏ ‎to ‎effectively‏ ‎save ‎their ‎resources ‎and ‎money

❇️The‏ ‎importance‏ ‎of ‎people-centric‏ ‎incident ‎response:‏ ‎The ‎document ‎emphasizes ‎the ‎importance‏ ‎of‏ ‎a‏ ‎people-centric ‎approach‏ ‎to ‎incident‏ ‎response. ‎It’s‏ ‎not‏ ‎just ‎about‏ ‎the ‎technology, ‎but ‎also ‎about‏ ‎the ‎people‏ ‎who‏ ‎use ‎it. ‎It’s‏ ‎a ‎good‏ ‎thing ‎we ‎have ‎this‏ ‎guide‏ ‎to ‎remind‏ ‎us ‎that‏ ‎people ‎are ‎involved ‎in ‎processes‏ ‎and‏ ‎that ‎there‏ ‎will ‎always‏ ‎be ‎something ‎to ‎keep ‎people‏ ‎busy‏ ‎and‏ ‎the ‎HR‏ ‎department ‎to‏ ‎find ‎new‏ ‎people‏ ‎for ‎new‏ ‎involvement

❇️The ‎need ‎for ‎clear ‎roles‏ ‎and ‎responsibilities:‏ ‎The‏ ‎document ‎stresses ‎the‏ ‎importance ‎of‏ ‎clear ‎roles ‎and ‎responsibilities‏ ‎in‏ ‎an ‎incident‏ ‎response. ‎It’s‏ ‎almost ‎as ‎if ‎people ‎work‏ ‎better‏ ‎when ‎they‏ ‎know ‎what‏ ‎they’re ‎supposed ‎to ‎be ‎doing,‏ ‎and‏ ‎yet‏ ‎management ‎still‏ ‎believes ‎that‏ ‎employees ‎can‏ ‎guess‏ ‎everything, ‎but‏ ‎Microsoft ‎politely ‎reminds ‎the ‎truisms.

❇️The‏ ‎incident ‎response‏ ‎maze:‏ ‎The ‎document ‎likens‏ ‎the ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎process ‎to ‎navigating‏ ‎a‏ ‎maze. ‎Because‏ ‎nothing ‎says‏ ‎«efficient ‎process» ‎like ‎a ‎structure‏ ‎designed‏ ‎to ‎confuse‏ ‎and ‎misdirect‏ ‎(The ‎sales ‎department ‎has ‎already‏ ‎received‏ ‎an‏ ‎award ‎for‏ ‎IR ‎leadership,‏ ‎hasn’t ‎you?)

❇️The‏ ‎importance‏ ‎of ‎preserving‏ ‎evidence: ‎The ‎document ‎highlights ‎the‏ ‎importance ‎of‏ ‎preserving‏ ‎evidence ‎after ‎a‏ ‎breach. ‎It’s‏ ‎a ‎good ‎thing ‎they‏ ‎mentioned‏ ‎it, ‎otherwise,‏ ‎we ‎might‏ ‎have ‎just ‎thrown ‎all ‎that‏ ‎valuable‏ ‎data ‎away

❇️The‏ ‎need ‎for‏ ‎a ‎response ‎model: ‎The ‎document‏ ‎suggests‏ ‎that‏ ‎organizations ‎should‏ ‎define ‎a‏ ‎response ‎model‏ ‎to‏ ‎manage ‎the‏ ‎incident. ‎It’s ‎almost ‎as ‎if‏ ‎having ‎a‏ ‎plan‏ ‎is ‎better ‎than‏ ‎not ‎having‏ ‎one ‎(get ‎busy ‎already).

❇️The‏ ‎need‏ ‎for ‎dedicated‏ ‎resources: ‎The‏ ‎document ‎suggests ‎that ‎organizations ‎should‏ ‎secure‏ ‎dedicated ‎resources‏ ‎for ‎incident‏ ‎response. ‎Because ‎apparently, ‎asking ‎your‏ ‎IT‏ ‎team‏ ‎to ‎handle‏ ‎a ‎major‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎incident‏ ‎in‏ ‎their ‎spare‏ ‎time ‎is ‎not ‎going ‎to‏ ‎work ‎as‏ ‎an‏ ‎approach ‎anymore.

❇️The ‎importance‏ ‎of ‎communication:‏ ‎The ‎document ‎emphasizes ‎the‏ ‎importance‏ ‎of ‎communication‏ ‎during ‎a‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎incident. ‎Because ‎it’s ‎not‏ ‎like‏ ‎people ‎need‏ ‎to ‎be‏ ‎kept ‎informed ‎during ‎a ‎crisis‏ ‎or‏ ‎anything‏ ‎(but ‎if‏ ‎they ‎wanted‏ ‎to, ‎they‏ ‎would‏ ‎have ‎guessed‏ ‎it ‎themselves).


So, ‎how ‎can ‎organizations‏ ‎ensure ‎their‏ ‎incident‏ ‎response ‎plan ‎is‏ ‎flexible ‎enough‏ ‎to ‎adapt ‎to ‎changing‏ ‎circumstances?‏ ‎Well, ‎it’s‏ ‎like ‎trying‏ ‎to ‎predict ‎the ‎weather ‎—‏ ‎you‏ ‎can’t ‎control‏ ‎it, ‎but‏ ‎you ‎can ‎prepare ‎for ‎it.

❇️Regularly‏ ‎review‏ ‎and‏ ‎update ‎the‏ ‎plan: ‎Threat‏ ‎landscapes ‎change‏ ‎faster‏ ‎than ‎fashion‏ ‎trends. ‎Regular ‎reviews ‎and ‎updates‏ ‎can ‎help‏ ‎ensure‏ ‎the ‎plan ‎stays‏ ‎relevant ‎and‏ ‎you ‎become ‎more ‎confident

❇️Test‏ ‎the‏ ‎plan: ‎Regular‏ ‎testing ‎can‏ ‎help ‎identify ‎gaps ‎and ‎areas‏ ‎for‏ ‎improvement. ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎rehearsing‏ ‎for ‎a ‎play ‎— ‎you‏ ‎want‏ ‎to‏ ‎know ‎your‏ ‎lines ‎before‏ ‎the ‎curtain‏ ‎goes‏ ‎up ‎(and‏ ‎you’ll ‎have ‎to ‎justify ‎everything,‏ ‎so ‎why‏ ‎not‏ ‎immediately ‎come ‎up‏ ‎with ‎answers‏ ‎for ‎all ‎occasions)

❇️Involve ‎all‏ ‎relevant‏ ‎stakeholders: ‎From‏ ‎IT ‎to‏ ‎legal ‎to ‎PR, ‎everyone ‎needs‏ ‎to‏ ‎know ‎their‏ ‎role ‎in‏ ‎the ‎plan. ‎It’s ‎like ‎a‏ ‎football‏ ‎team‏ ‎— ‎everyone‏ ‎needs ‎to‏ ‎know ‎the‏ ‎play‏ ‎to ‎score‏ ‎a ‎touchdown ‎(no ‎one ‎will‏ ‎get ‎away‏ ‎with‏ ‎overtime ‎work).


Preserving ‎evidence‏ ‎while ‎responding‏ ‎to ‎an ‎incident ‎seems‏ ‎to‏ ‎be ‎absolutely‏ ‎important, ‎otherwise‏ ‎why ‎would ‎you ‎buy ‎so‏ ‎many‏ ‎disks ‎in‏ ‎a ‎RAID0‏ ‎solution ‎(and ‎wipe ‎your ‎anime‏ ‎from‏ ‎there).

❇️Inadvertent‏ ‎evidence ‎destruction:‏ ‎In ‎the‏ ‎rush ‎to‏ ‎remediate,‏ ‎organizations ‎often‏ ‎destroy ‎evidence. ‎It’s ‎like ‎washing‏ ‎the ‎dishes‏ ‎before‏ ‎the ‎food ‎critic‏ ‎has ‎a‏ ‎chance ‎to ‎taste ‎the‏ ‎soup

❇️Lack‏ ‎of ‎forensic‏ ‎expertise: ‎Preserving‏ ‎digital ‎evidence ‎requires ‎specialized ‎knowledge‏ ‎and‏ ‎skills. ‎Without‏ ‎them, ‎evidence‏ ‎can ‎be ‎easily ‎overlooked ‎or‏ ‎mishandled‏ ‎(now‏ ‎it’s ‎obvious‏ ‎why ‎RAID1‏ ‎exists)

❇️Failure ‎to‏ ‎consider‏ ‎legal ‎requirements:‏ ‎Depending ‎on ‎the ‎nature ‎of‏ ‎the ‎incident,‏ ‎there‏ ‎may ‎be ‎legal‏ ‎requirements ‎for‏ ‎evidence ‎preservation. ‎Ignoring ‎these‏ ‎can‏ ‎lead ‎to‏ ‎penalties ‎and‏ ‎undermine ‎any ‎legal ‎proceedings ‎(Microsoft‏ ‎has‏ ‎even ‎pre-built‏ ‎hash ‎functions‏ ‎in ‎their ‎terminal)


So, ‎there ‎you‏ ‎have‏ ‎it.‏ ‎A ‎snarky‏ ‎Microsoft’s ‎guide‏ ‎to ‎navigating‏ ‎the‏ ‎maze ‎of‏ ‎incident ‎response. ‎It’s ‎a ‎wild,‏ ‎complex, ‎and‏ ‎often‏ ‎frustrating ‎world, ‎but‏ ‎with ‎the‏ ‎right ‎plan ‎and ‎people,‏ ‎you‏ ‎can ‎navigate‏ ‎it ‎like‏ ‎a ‎pro.


Unpacking ‎in ‎more ‎detail:

Подарить подписку

Будет создан код, который позволит адресату получить бесплатный для него доступ на определённый уровень подписки.

Оплата за этого пользователя будет списываться с вашей карты вплоть до отмены подписки. Код может быть показан на экране или отправлен по почте вместе с инструкцией.

Будет создан код, который позволит адресату получить сумму на баланс.

Разово будет списана указанная сумма и зачислена на баланс пользователя, воспользовавшегося данным промокодом.

Добавить карту
0/2048