logo
Overkill Security  Because Nothing Says 'Security' Like a Dozen Firewalls and a Biometric Scanner
О проекте Просмотр Уровни подписки Фильтры Обновления проекта Контакты Поделиться Метки
Все проекты
О проекте
A blog about all things techy! Not too much hype, just a lot of cool analysis and insight from different sources.

📌Not sure what level is suitable for you? Check this explanation https://sponsr.ru/overkill_security/55291/Paid_Content/

QA — directly or via email overkill_qa@outlook.com
Публикации, доступные бесплатно
Уровни подписки
Единоразовый платёж

Your donation fuels our mission to provide cutting-edge cybersecurity research, in-depth tutorials, and expert insights. Support our work today to empower the community with even more valuable content.

*no refund, no paid content

Помочь проекту
Regular Reader 1 500₽ месяц 16 200₽ год
(-10%)
При подписке на год для вас действует 10% скидка. 10% основная скидка и 0% доп. скидка за ваш уровень на проекте Overkill Security

Ideal for regular readers who are interested in staying informed about the latest trends and updates in the cybersecurity world without.

Оформить подписку
Pro Reader 3 000₽ месяц 30 600₽ год
(-15%)
При подписке на год для вас действует 15% скидка. 15% основная скидка и 0% доп. скидка за ваш уровень на проекте Overkill Security

Designed for IT professionals, cybersecurity experts, and enthusiasts who seek deeper insights and more comprehensive resources. + Q&A

Оформить подписку
Фильтры
Обновления проекта
Контакты
Поделиться
Метки
Читать: 1+ мин
logo Overkill Security

FBI IC3

Attackers ‎are‏ ‎employing ‎a ‎variety ‎of ‎methods,‏ ‎including ‎phishing‏ ‎emails‏ ‎with ‎malicious ‎attachments,‏ ‎obfuscated ‎script‏ ‎files, ‎and ‎Guloader ‎PowerShell,‏ ‎to‏ ‎infiltrate ‎and‏ ‎compromise ‎victim‏ ‎systems. ‎Invoice ‎fraud, ‎a ‎form‏ ‎of‏ ‎business ‎email‏ ‎compromise ‎(BEC),‏ ‎is ‎one ‎of ‎the ‎popular‏ ‎methods‏ ‎used‏ ‎by ‎attackers‏ ‎to ‎deceive‏ ‎victims. ‎In‏ ‎this‏ ‎type ‎of‏ ‎scam, ‎a ‎third ‎party ‎requests‏ ‎payment ‎fraudulently,‏ ‎often‏ ‎by ‎impersonating ‎a‏ ‎legitimate ‎vendor

Invoice‏ ‎scams ‎pose ‎a ‎significant‏ ‎threat‏ ‎to ‎businesses,‏ ‎as ‎they‏ ‎can ‎result ‎in ‎substantial ‎financial‏ ‎losses‏ ‎and ‎irreparable‏ ‎damage. ‎According‏ ‎to ‎the ‎FBI ‎IC3 ‎report,‏ ‎in‏ ‎2022,‏ ‎BEC ‎attacks‏ ‎caused ‎$2.7‏ ‎billion ‎in‏ ‎losses‏ ‎to ‎US‏ ‎victims, ‎making ‎it ‎the ‎most‏ ‎pervasive ‎form‏ ‎of‏ ‎business ‎email ‎compromise.

Some‏ ‎indicators ‎of‏ ‎fraudulent ‎email ‎invoices ‎include‏ ‎requests‏ ‎for ‎personally‏ ‎identifiable ‎information‏ ‎(PII), ‎unusual ‎requests ‎such ‎as‏ ‎changes‏ ‎to ‎banking‏ ‎or ‎payment‏ ‎information, ‎and ‎invoices ‎with ‎unusual‏ ‎dollar‏ ‎amounts.‏ ‎Additionally, ‎attackers‏ ‎often ‎use‏ ‎obfuscation ‎techniques‏ ‎to‏ ‎evade ‎defenses‏ ‎and ‎make ‎their ‎malicious ‎activities‏ ‎more ‎difficult‏ ‎to‏ ‎detect.

Читать: 2+ мин
logo Overkill Security

TA547 phishing campaign

The ‎TA547‏ ‎phishing ‎campaign ‎using ‎the ‎Rhadamanthys‏ ‎stealer ‎represents‏ ‎a‏ ‎significant ‎evolution ‎in‏ ‎cybercriminal ‎tactics,‏ ‎notably ‎through ‎the ‎integration‏ ‎of‏ ‎AI-generated ‎scripts.‏ ‎This ‎development‏ ‎serves ‎as ‎a ‎critical ‎reminder‏ ‎for‏ ‎organizations ‎to‏ ‎continuously ‎update‏ ‎and ‎adapt ‎their ‎cybersecurity ‎strategies‏ ‎to‏ ‎counter‏ ‎sophisticated ‎and‏ ‎evolving ‎threats.

Key‏ ‎Details ‎of‏ ‎the‏ ‎Attack

📌Impersonation ‎and‏ ‎Email ‎Content: ‎The ‎phishing ‎emails‏ ‎were ‎crafted‏ ‎to‏ ‎impersonate ‎the ‎German‏ ‎company ‎Metro‏ ‎AG, ‎presenting ‎themselves ‎as‏ ‎invoice-related‏ ‎communications. ‎These‏ ‎emails ‎contained‏ ‎a ‎password-protected ‎ZIP ‎file, ‎which‏ ‎when‏ ‎opened, ‎triggered‏ ‎a ‎remote‏ ‎PowerShell ‎script

📌Execution ‎Method: ‎The ‎PowerShell‏ ‎script‏ ‎executed‏ ‎directly ‎in‏ ‎memory, ‎deploying‏ ‎the ‎Rhadamanthys‏ ‎stealer‏ ‎without ‎writing‏ ‎to ‎the ‎disk. ‎This ‎method‏ ‎helps ‎avoid‏ ‎detection‏ ‎by ‎traditional ‎antivirus‏ ‎software

📌Use ‎of‏ ‎AI ‎in ‎Malware ‎Creation:‏ ‎There‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎strong ‎indication‏ ‎that ‎the ‎PowerShell ‎script ‎was‏ ‎generated‏ ‎or ‎at‏ ‎least ‎refined‏ ‎using ‎a ‎large ‎language ‎model‏ ‎(LLM).‏ ‎The‏ ‎script ‎featured‏ ‎grammatically ‎correct‏ ‎and ‎highly‏ ‎specific‏ ‎comments, ‎which‏ ‎is ‎atypical ‎for ‎human-generated ‎malware‏ ‎scripts

Evolving ‎Tactics‏ ‎and‏ ‎Techniques

📌Innovative ‎Lures ‎and‏ ‎Delivery ‎Methods:‏ ‎The ‎campaign ‎also ‎experimented‏ ‎with‏ ‎new ‎phishing‏ ‎tactics, ‎such‏ ‎as ‎voice ‎message ‎notifications ‎and‏ ‎SVG‏ ‎image ‎embedding,‏ ‎to ‎enhance‏ ‎the ‎effectiveness ‎of ‎credential ‎harvesting‏ ‎attacks

📌AI‏ ‎and‏ ‎Cybercrime: ‎The‏ ‎use ‎of‏ ‎AI ‎technologies‏ ‎like‏ ‎ChatGPT ‎or‏ ‎CoPilot ‎in ‎scripting ‎the ‎malware‏ ‎indicates ‎a‏ ‎significant‏ ‎shift ‎in ‎cybercrime‏ ‎tactics, ‎suggesting‏ ‎that ‎cybercriminals ‎are ‎increasingly‏ ‎leveraging‏ ‎AI ‎to‏ ‎refine ‎their‏ ‎attack ‎methods

📌Broader ‎Implications: ‎This ‎campaign‏ ‎not‏ ‎only ‎highlights‏ ‎the ‎adaptability‏ ‎and ‎technical ‎sophistication ‎of ‎TA547‏ ‎but‏ ‎also‏ ‎underscores ‎the‏ ‎broader ‎trend‏ ‎of ‎cybercriminals‏ ‎integrating‏ ‎AI ‎tools‏ ‎into ‎their ‎operations. ‎This ‎integration‏ ‎could ‎potentially‏ ‎lead‏ ‎to ‎more ‎effective‏ ‎and ‎harder-to-detect‏ ‎cyber ‎threats

Recommendations ‎for ‎Defense

📌Employee‏ ‎Training: Organizations‏ ‎should ‎enhance‏ ‎their ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎defenses ‎by ‎training ‎employees ‎to‏ ‎recognize‏ ‎phishing ‎attempts‏ ‎and ‎suspicious‏ ‎email ‎content

📌Technical ‎Safeguards: ‎Implementing ‎strict‏ ‎group‏ ‎policies‏ ‎to ‎restrict‏ ‎traffic ‎from‏ ‎unknown ‎sources‏ ‎and‏ ‎ad ‎networks‏ ‎can ‎help ‎protect ‎endpoints ‎from‏ ‎such ‎attacks

📌Behavior-Based‏ ‎Detection: Despite‏ ‎the ‎use ‎of‏ ‎AI ‎in‏ ‎crafting ‎attacks, ‎behavior-based ‎detection‏ ‎mechanisms‏ ‎remain ‎effective‏ ‎in ‎identifying‏ ‎and ‎mitigating ‎such ‎threats

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Overkill Security

Evilginx + GoPhish

The ‎article‏ ‎from ‎BreakDev discusses ‎the ‎integration ‎of‏ ‎Evilginx ‎3.3‏ ‎with‏ ‎GoPhish, ‎a ‎significant‏ ‎update ‎that‏ ‎enhances ‎phishing ‎campaign ‎capabilities.‏ ‎These‏ ‎updates ‎to‏ ‎Evilginx ‎and‏ ‎its ‎integration ‎with ‎GoPhish ‎represent‏ ‎significant‏ ‎advancements ‎in‏ ‎phishing ‎campaign‏ ‎technology, ‎offering ‎users ‎more ‎sophisticated‏ ‎tools‏ ‎for‏ ‎creating ‎and‏ ‎managing ‎phishing‏ ‎attempts ‎with‏ ‎enhanced‏ ‎customization ‎and‏ ‎tracking ‎capabilities.

Here ‎are ‎the ‎key‏ ‎points ‎and‏ ‎new‏ ‎features ‎introduced:

📌Integration ‎with‏ ‎GoPhish: Evilginx ‎now‏ ‎officially ‎integrates ‎with ‎GoPhish‏ ‎by‏ ‎Jordan ‎Wright.‏ ‎This ‎collaboration‏ ‎allows ‎users ‎to ‎create ‎phishing‏ ‎campaigns‏ ‎that ‎send‏ ‎emails ‎with‏ ‎valid ‎Evilginx ‎lure ‎URLs, ‎leveraging‏ ‎GoPhish’s‏ ‎user‏ ‎interface ‎to‏ ‎monitor ‎the‏ ‎campaign’s ‎effectiveness,‏ ‎including‏ ‎email ‎opens,‏ ‎lure ‎URL ‎clicks, ‎and ‎successful‏ ‎session ‎captures.

📌API‏ ‎Enhancements: The‏ ‎update ‎has ‎introduced‏ ‎additional ‎API‏ ‎endpoints ‎in ‎GoPhish, ‎enabling‏ ‎changes‏ ‎to ‎the‏ ‎results ‎status‏ ‎for ‎every ‎sent ‎email. ‎This‏ ‎improvement‏ ‎facilitates ‎more‏ ‎dynamic ‎and‏ ‎responsive ‎campaign ‎management.

📌Lure ‎URL ‎Generation: In‏ ‎the‏ ‎new‏ ‎workflow, ‎when‏ ‎creating ‎a‏ ‎campaign ‎in‏ ‎GoPhish,‏ ‎users ‎no‏ ‎longer ‎select ‎a ‎«Landing ‎Page.»‏ ‎Instead, ‎they‏ ‎generate‏ ‎a ‎lure ‎URL‏ ‎in ‎Evilginx‏ ‎and ‎input ‎it ‎into‏ ‎the‏ ‎«Evilginx ‎Lure‏ ‎URL» ‎text‏ ‎box. ‎This ‎process ‎streamlines ‎the‏ ‎creation‏ ‎of ‎phishing‏ ‎campaigns.

📌Custom ‎Parameters‏ ‎and ‎Personalization: GoPhish ‎automatically ‎generates ‎encrypted‏ ‎custom‏ ‎parameters‏ ‎with ‎personalized‏ ‎content ‎for‏ ‎each ‎link‏ ‎embedded‏ ‎in ‎the‏ ‎generated ‎email ‎messages. ‎These ‎parameters‏ ‎include ‎the‏ ‎recipient’s‏ ‎first ‎name, ‎last‏ ‎name, ‎and‏ ‎email. ‎This ‎feature ‎allows‏ ‎for‏ ‎the ‎customization‏ ‎of ‎phishing‏ ‎pages ‎through ‎js_inject ‎scripts, ‎enhancing‏ ‎the‏ ‎effectiveness ‎of‏ ‎phishing ‎attempts.

📌Expanded‏ ‎TLD ‎Support: Evilginx ‎has ‎expanded ‎its‏ ‎support‏ ‎for‏ ‎new ‎Top-Level‏ ‎Domains ‎(TLDs)‏ ‎to ‎improve‏ ‎the‏ ‎efficiency ‎of‏ ‎URL ‎detection ‎in ‎proxied ‎packets.‏ ‎This ‎update‏ ‎aims‏ ‎to ‎better ‎differentiate‏ ‎between ‎phishing‏ ‎and ‎original ‎domains ‎by‏ ‎recognizing‏ ‎URLs ‎ending‏ ‎with ‎a‏ ‎broader ‎range ‎of ‎known ‎TLDs.‏ ‎The‏ ‎updated ‎list‏ ‎includes ‎a‏ ‎variety ‎of ‎TLDs, ‎such ‎as‏ ‎.aero,‏ ‎.arpa,‏ ‎.biz, ‎.cloud,‏ ‎.gov, ‎.info,‏ ‎.net, ‎.org,‏ ‎and‏ ‎many ‎others,‏ ‎including ‎all ‎known ‎2-character ‎TLDs.

**

Evilginx‏ ‎and ‎GoPhish‏ ‎are‏ ‎tools ‎used ‎in‏ ‎cybersecurity, ‎particularly‏ ‎in ‎the ‎context ‎of‏ ‎phishing‏ ‎simulations ‎and‏ ‎man-in-the-middle ‎(MitM)‏ ‎attack ‎frameworks. ‎They ‎serve ‎different‏ ‎purposes‏ ‎but ‎can‏ ‎be ‎used‏ ‎together ‎to ‎enhance ‎phishing ‎campaigns‏ ‎and‏ ‎security‏ ‎testing.

📌Evilginx ‎is‏ ‎a ‎man-in-the-middle‏ ‎attack ‎framework‏ ‎that‏ ‎can ‎bypass‏ ‎two-factor ‎authentication ‎(2FA) ‎mechanisms.

  • It ‎works‏ ‎by ‎tricking‏ ‎a‏ ‎user ‎into ‎visiting‏ ‎a ‎proxy‏ ‎site ‎that ‎looks ‎like‏ ‎the‏ ‎legitimate ‎site‏ ‎they ‎intend‏ ‎to ‎visit. ‎As ‎the ‎user‏ ‎logs‏ ‎in ‎and‏ ‎completes ‎the‏ ‎2FA ‎challenge, ‎Evilginx ‎captures ‎the‏ ‎user’s‏ ‎login‏ ‎information ‎and‏ ‎the ‎authentication‏ ‎token.
  • This ‎method‏ ‎allows‏ ‎the ‎attacker‏ ‎to ‎replay ‎the ‎token ‎and‏ ‎access ‎the‏ ‎targeted‏ ‎service ‎as ‎the‏ ‎user, ‎effectively‏ ‎bypassing ‎2FA ‎protections.

📌GoPhish ‎is‏ ‎an‏ ‎open-source ‎phishing‏ ‎toolkit ‎designed‏ ‎for ‎businesses ‎and ‎security ‎professionals‏ ‎to‏ ‎conduct ‎security‏ ‎awareness ‎training‏ ‎and ‎phishing ‎simulation ‎exercises.

  • It ‎allows‏ ‎users‏ ‎to‏ ‎create ‎and‏ ‎track ‎the‏ ‎effectiveness ‎of‏ ‎phishing‏ ‎campaigns, ‎including‏ ‎email ‎opens, ‎link ‎clicks, ‎and‏ ‎data ‎submission‏ ‎on‏ ‎phishing ‎pages.
Читать: 5+ мин
logo Overkill Security

Phishing in UK

Phishing ‎attacks‏ ‎are ‎on ‎the ‎rise ‎in‏ ‎the ‎UK,‏ ‎and‏ ‎it ‎seems ‎our‏ ‎cybercriminal ‎friends‏ ‎have ‎been ‎busy ‎updating‏ ‎their‏ ‎deception ‎toolkit.‏ ‎They’re ‎no‏ ‎longer ‎just ‎sending ‎out ‎those‏ ‎fancy‏ ‎«I’m ‎the‏ ‎deposed ‎prince»‏ ‎emails. ‎No, ‎they ‎switched ‎to‏ ‎high‏ ‎technology,‏ ‎plunging ‎into‏ ‎the ‎exciting‏ ‎world ‎of‏ ‎QR‏ ‎phishing ‎(or‏ ‎«quishing», ‎because ‎apparently ‎everything ‎is‏ ‎better ‎with‏ ‎«q»)‏ ‎and ‎even ‎connecting‏ ‎artificial ‎intelligence‏ ‎to ‎write ‎these ‎such‏ ‎convincing‏ ‎fraudulent ‎emails.

And‏ ‎for ‎those‏ ‎who ‎thought ‎QR ‎codes ‎were‏ ‎just‏ ‎a ‎harmless‏ ‎way ‎to‏ ‎download ‎a ‎restaurant ‎menu, ‎think‏ ‎again.‏ ‎They’re‏ ‎the ‎new‏ ‎golden ‎ticket‏ ‎for ‎scammers‏ ‎on‏ ‎social ‎media,‏ ‎preying ‎on ‎the ‎unsuspecting ‎masses‏ ‎looking ‎for‏ ‎concert‏ ‎tickets ‎or ‎the‏ ‎next ‎big‏ ‎sale. ‎Meanwhile, ‎AI ‎is‏ ‎making‏ ‎it ‎easier‏ ‎than ‎ever‏ ‎to ‎fake ‎someone’s ‎identity, ‎because‏ ‎who‏ ‎needs ‎real‏ ‎fingerprints ‎or‏ ‎faces ‎anymore?

Let’s ‎start ‎with ‎the‏ ‎classic‏ ‎«vishing»‏ ‎call ‎centers,‏ ‎where ‎enterprising‏ ‎scammers ‎in‏ ‎Ukraine‏ ‎and ‎the‏ ‎Czech ‎Republic ‎put ‎on ‎their‏ ‎best ‎British‏ ‎accents‏ ‎to ‎convince ‎you‏ ‎to ‎send‏ ‎them ‎a ‎bit ‎of‏ ‎pocket‏ ‎change—just ‎tens‏ ‎of ‎millions‏ ‎of ‎euros. ‎Who ‎knew ‎that‏ ‎the‏ ‎voice ‎on‏ ‎the ‎other‏ ‎end ‎of ‎the ‎phone ‎asking‏ ‎for‏ ‎your‏ ‎bank ‎details‏ ‎was ‎actually‏ ‎Boris ‎in‏ ‎Praha,‏ ‎not ‎Barclays‏ ‎in ‎Knightsbridge?

Then ‎there’s ‎the ‎hospitality‏ ‎hustle, ‎where‏ ‎hotel‏ ‎employees ‎are ‎duped‏ ‎by ‎emails‏ ‎that ‎are ‎about ‎as‏ ‎genuine‏ ‎as ‎a‏ ‎three-pound ‎note.‏ ‎Click ‎on ‎this ‎link, ‎and‏ ‎voila!‏ ‎You’ve ‎just‏ ‎given ‎a‏ ‎hacker ‎a ‎five-star ‎stay ‎in‏ ‎your‏ ‎computer‏ ‎system.

And ‎let’s‏ ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎the ‎good‏ ‎old‏ ‎United ‎States‏ ‎Postal ‎Service, ‎or ‎as ‎the‏ ‎scammers ‎would‏ ‎have‏ ‎it, ‎the ‎«United‏ ‎Scams ‎Phishing‏ ‎Service.» ‎They’ve ‎been ‎sending‏ ‎out‏ ‎emails ‎that‏ ‎are ‎so‏ ‎convincing ‎you’d ‎think ‎Mr. ‎Postman‏ ‎himself‏ ‎was ‎asking‏ ‎for ‎your‏ ‎details. ‎Except ‎instead ‎of ‎delivering‏ ‎parcels,‏ ‎they’re‏ ‎parceling ‎out‏ ‎your ‎personal‏ ‎info ‎to‏ ‎the‏ ‎highest ‎bidder.

Over‏ ‎in ‎the ‎world ‎of ‎UK‏ ‎transport, ‎it‏ ‎seems‏ ‎some ‎employees ‎couldn’t‏ ‎spot ‎a‏ ‎phishing ‎attack ‎if ‎it‏ ‎came‏ ‎with ‎a‏ ‎side ‎of‏ ‎chips. ‎An ‎email ‎with ‎a‏ ‎fake‏ ‎portal ‎link‏ ‎was ‎all‏ ‎it ‎took ‎to ‎turn ‎their‏ ‎mailboxes‏ ‎into‏ ‎an ‎all-you-can-eat‏ ‎data ‎buffet.

But‏ ‎wait, ‎there’s‏ ‎more!‏ ‎The ‎latest‏ ‎trend ‎is ‎«quishing, ‎» ‎where‏ ‎QR ‎codes‏ ‎are‏ ‎the ‎new ‎black‏ ‎for ‎cyber‏ ‎swindlers. ‎Because ‎nothing ‎says‏ ‎«trust‏ ‎me» ‎like‏ ‎scanning ‎a‏ ‎mysterious ‎barcode ‎that ‎promises ‎a‏ ‎package‏ ‎delivery ‎but‏ ‎delivers ‎a‏ ‎package ‎of ‎malware ‎instead.

Law ‎firms‏ ‎aren’t‏ ‎immune‏ ‎to ‎the‏ ‎phishing ‎frenzy‏ ‎either. ‎One‏ ‎click‏ ‎is ‎on‏ ‎a ‎dodgy ‎link, ‎and ‎suddenly‏ ‎you’re ‎not‏ ‎just‏ ‎practicing ‎law, ‎you’re‏ ‎practicing ‎how‏ ‎to ‎explain ‎to ‎your‏ ‎clients‏ ‎why ‎their‏ ‎confidential ‎information‏ ‎is ‎now ‎trending ‎on ‎the‏ ‎dark‏ ‎web.

Job ‎seekers,‏ ‎beware ‎the‏ ‎WhatsApp ‎wiles, ‎where ‎scammers ‎are‏ ‎offering‏ ‎you‏ ‎the ‎job‏ ‎of ‎a‏ ‎lifetime—so ‎long‏ ‎as‏ ‎your ‎lifetime‏ ‎dream ‎was ‎to ‎be ‎part‏ ‎of ‎a‏ ‎fraud‏ ‎scheme.

Small ‎business, ‎you‏ ‎are ‎not‏ ‎small ‎enough ‎to ‎be‏ ‎noticed!‏ ‎In ‎fact,‏ ‎you ‎are‏ ‎the ‎star ‎of ‎the ‎show,‏ ‎and‏ ‎a ‎whopping‏ ‎82% ‎of‏ ‎online ‎threats ‎concern ‎only ‎you.‏ ‎And‏ ‎let’s‏ ‎applaud ‎for‏ ‎the ‎464%‏ ‎increase ‎in‏ ‎the‏ ‎number ‎of‏ ‎phishing ‎attacks ‎in ‎your ‎industry.

And‏ ‎who ‎is‏ ‎on‏ ‎the ‎front ‎line‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎fight ‎against ‎this ‎digital‏ ‎epidemic?‏ ‎The ‎National‏ ‎Cyber ‎Security‏ ‎Center ‎(NCSC) ‎and ‎Action ‎Fraud,‏ ‎armed‏ ‎with ‎their‏ ‎powerful ‎resources,‏ ‎are ‎helping ‎the ‎public ‎report‏ ‎these‏ ‎dastardly‏ ‎acts. ‎Because‏ ‎nothing ‎says‏ ‎«we ‎have‏ ‎everything‏ ‎under ‎control»‏ ‎like ‎a ‎government ‎website ‎and‏ ‎a ‎hotline.

The‏ ‎UK‏ ‎government ‎has ‎rolled‏ ‎out ‎the‏ ‎red ‎carpet ‎for ‎the‏ ‎«world’s‏ ‎first» ‎charter‏ ‎with ‎tech‏ ‎giants, ‎promising ‎to ‎block ‎and‏ ‎remove‏ ‎fraudulent ‎content.‏ ‎Because ‎if‏ ‎there’s ‎one ‎thing ‎that ‎will‏ ‎deter‏ ‎scammers,‏ ‎it’s ‎a‏ ‎clearly ‎worded‏ ‎team ‎agreement‏ ‎with‏ ‎the ‎National‏ ‎Crime ‎Agency ‎(NCA) ‎and ‎the‏ ‎Cybercrime ‎Division.

Education‏ ‎and‏ ‎awareness ‎are ‎touted‏ ‎as ‎«silver‏ ‎bullets» ‎against ‎this ‎growing‏ ‎threat.‏ ‎Various ‎organizations‏ ‎offer ‎phishing‏ ‎awareness ‎courses ‎because ‎watching ‎a‏ ‎PowerPoint‏ ‎presentation ‎is‏ ‎a ‎sure‏ ‎way ‎to ‎defeat ‎sophisticated ‎cybercriminals.‏ ‎And‏ ‎let’s‏ ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎about ‎international‏ ‎cooperation, ‎because‏ ‎phishing,‏ ‎like ‎a‏ ‎severe ‎cold, ‎knows ‎no ‎boundaries.

So,‏ ‎as ‎we‏ ‎wrap‏ ‎up ‎this ‎festive‏ ‎phishing ‎roundup,‏ ‎remember: ‎if ‎it ‎looks‏ ‎like‏ ‎a ‎scam‏ ‎and ‎smells‏ ‎like ‎a ‎scam, ‎it’s ‎probably‏ ‎just‏ ‎another ‎day‏ ‎on ‎the‏ ‎internet. ‎Keep ‎your ‎wits ‎about‏ ‎you,‏ ‎and‏ ‎maybe ‎don’t‏ ‎click ‎on‏ ‎that ‎link‏ ‎from‏ ‎«Her ‎Majesty’s‏ ‎Secret ‎Service» ‎promising ‎you ‎a‏ ‎tax ‎refund‏ ‎in‏ ‎Poundcoin.


Unpacking ‎in ‎more‏ ‎detail

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Overkill Security

Blizzard attacks

«Star ‎Blizzard»‏ ‎should ‎not ‎be ‎confused ‎with‏ ‎a ‎celestial‏ ‎weather‏ ‎phenomenon ‎or ‎a‏ ‎limited-edition ‎threat‏ ‎from ‎the ‎Dairy ‎Queen.‏ ‎This‏ ‎saga ‎takes‏ ‎place ‎in‏ ‎a ‎digital ‎space ‎where ‎the‏ ‎only‏ ‎snowflakes ‎are‏ ‎the ‎unique‏ ‎identifiers ‎of ‎each ‎hacked ‎system.


The‏ ‎audacity‏ ‎of‏ ‎Blizzard, ‎which‏ ‎conducts ‎targeted‏ ‎social ‎engineering‏ ‎attacks‏ ‎on ‎Microsoft‏ ‎Teams ‎using ‎ready-made ‎infrastructure ‎against‏ ‎everyone ‎who‏ ‎uses‏ ‎it. ‎The ‎group‏ ‎has ‎been‏ ‎doing ‎this ‎since ‎November‏ ‎2023,‏ ‎remaining ‎unnoticed‏ ‎until ‎January‏ ‎12, ‎2024. ‎And ‎not ‎just‏ ‎sneaking‏ ‎around, ‎but‏ ‎camping, ‎making‏ ‎a ‎bonfire ‎in ‎your ‎digital‏ ‎backyard‏ ‎while‏ ‎you ‎serenely‏ ‎watched ‎your‏ ‎favorite ‎TV‏ ‎series.

❇️Imagine,‏ ‎if ‎you‏ ‎will, ‎the ‎finance ‎industry, ‎with‏ ‎all ‎its‏ ‎high-stakes‏ ‎and ‎even ‎higher‏ ‎egos, ‎getting‏ ‎a ‎digital ‎pie ‎to‏ ‎the‏ ‎face ‎courtesy‏ ‎of ‎our‏ ‎mischievous ‎friends ‎at ‎Star ‎Blizzard.‏ ‎«Oh,‏ ‎what’s ‎this?‏ ‎Another ‎'urgent'‏ ‎wire ‎transfer ‎request ‎from ‎the‏ ‎CEO‏ ‎who’s‏ ‎currently ‎on‏ ‎a ‎safari?‏ ‎Sure, ‎let’s‏ ‎expedite‏ ‎that!»

❇️Then ‎there’s‏ ‎the ‎healthcare ‎sector, ‎tirelessly ‎working‏ ‎to ‎save‏ ‎lives,‏ ‎only ‎to ‎have‏ ‎their ‎systems‏ ‎held ‎hostage ‎by ‎a‏ ‎cyberattack.‏ ‎«We’ve ‎encrypted‏ ‎your ‎files,‏ ‎but ‎think ‎of ‎this ‎as‏ ‎a‏ ‎team-building ‎exercise.‏ ‎How ‎quickly‏ ‎can ‎you ‎work ‎together ‎to‏ ‎get‏ ‎them‏ ‎back?» ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎a‏ ‎game ‎of‏ ‎Operation,‏ ‎but ‎the‏ ‎only ‎buzzing ‎sound ‎is ‎the‏ ‎collective ‎panic‏ ‎of‏ ‎the ‎IT ‎department.

❇️Let’s‏ ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎the ‎government ‎agencies, ‎those‏ ‎bastions‏ ‎of ‎bureaucracy,‏ ‎where ‎a‏ ‎single ‎phishing ‎email ‎can ‎lead‏ ‎to‏ ‎the ‎kind‏ ‎of ‎chaos.‏ ‎«Oops, ‎did ‎we ‎accidentally ‎leak‏ ‎classified‏ ‎documents?‏ ‎Our ‎bad.‏ ‎But ‎hey,‏ ‎transparency ‎is‏ ‎important,‏ ‎right?»

❇️And ‎of‏ ‎course, ‎the ‎retail ‎industry, ‎where‏ ‎the ‎point-of-sale‏ ‎systems‏ ‎are ‎as ‎vulnerable‏ ‎as ‎a‏ ‎house ‎of ‎cards ‎in‏ ‎a‏ ‎wind ‎tunnel.‏ ‎«Black ‎Friday‏ ‎sale! ‎Everything ‎must ‎go! ‎Including‏ ‎your‏ ‎credit ‎card‏ ‎details!»


In ‎the‏ ‎world ‎of ‎cybersecurity, ‎where ‎the‏ ‎stakes‏ ‎are‏ ‎high ‎and‏ ‎the ‎attackers‏ ‎are ‎always‏ ‎looking‏ ‎for ‎the‏ ‎next ‎weak ‎link, ‎it’s ‎a‏ ‎wonder ‎that‏ ‎any‏ ‎industry ‎can ‎keep‏ ‎a ‎straight‏ ‎face. ‎So, ‎let’s ‎all‏ ‎have‏ ‎a ‎nervous‏ ‎chuckle ‎and‏ ‎then ‎maybe, ‎just ‎maybe, ‎update‏ ‎those‏ ‎passwords.


Unpacking ‎in‏ ‎more ‎detail



Читать: 4+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Patent US11611582B2

The ‎patent‏ ‎US11611582B2 ‎has ‎bestowed ‎upon ‎us‏ ‎a ‎computer-implemented‏ ‎method‏ ‎that ‎uses ‎a‏ ‎pre-defined ‎statistical‏ ‎model ‎to ‎detect ‎phishing‏ ‎threats.‏ ‎Because, ‎you‏ ‎know, ‎phishing‏ ‎is ‎such ‎a ‎novel ‎concept‏ ‎that‏ ‎we’ve ‎never‏ ‎thought ‎to‏ ‎guard ‎against ‎it ‎before.

This ‎method,‏ ‎a‏ ‎dazzling‏ ‎spectacle ‎of‏ ‎machine ‎learning‏ ‎wizardry, ‎dynamically‏ ‎analyzes‏ ‎network ‎requests‏ ‎in ‎real-time. ‎It’s ‎not ‎just‏ ‎any ‎analysis,‏ ‎though—it’s‏ ‎proactive! ‎That ‎means‏ ‎it ‎actually‏ ‎tries ‎to ‎stop ‎phishing‏ ‎attacks‏ ‎before ‎they‏ ‎happen, ‎unlike‏ ‎those ‎other ‎lazy ‎methods ‎that‏ ‎just‏ ‎sit ‎around‏ ‎waiting ‎for‏ ‎disaster ‎to ‎strike.

When ‎a ‎network‏ ‎request‏ ‎graciously‏ ‎makes ‎its‏ ‎way ‎to‏ ‎our ‎system,‏ ‎it‏ ‎must ‎first‏ ‎reveal ‎its ‎secrets—things ‎like ‎the‏ ‎fully ‎qualified‏ ‎domain‏ ‎name, ‎the ‎domain’s‏ ‎age ‎(because‏ ‎older ‎domains ‎clearly ‎have‏ ‎more‏ ‎wisdom), ‎the‏ ‎domain ‎registrar,‏ ‎IP ‎address, ‎and ‎even ‎its‏ ‎geographic‏ ‎location. ‎Because‏ ‎obviously, ‎geographic‏ ‎location ‎is ‎crucial. ‎Everyone ‎knows‏ ‎that‏ ‎phishing‏ ‎attacks ‎from‏ ‎scenic ‎locations‏ ‎are ‎less‏ ‎suspicious.

These‏ ‎juicy ‎details‏ ‎are ‎then ‎fed ‎to ‎the‏ ‎ever-hungry, ‎pre-trained‏ ‎statistical‏ ‎model, ‎which, ‎in‏ ‎its ‎infinite‏ ‎wisdom, ‎calculates ‎a ‎probability‏ ‎score.‏ ‎This ‎score,‏ ‎a ‎beacon‏ ‎of ‎numerical ‎judgment, ‎tells ‎us‏ ‎the‏ ‎likelihood ‎that‏ ‎this ‎humble‏ ‎network ‎request ‎is ‎actually ‎a‏ ‎wolf‏ ‎in‏ ‎sheep’s ‎clothing,‏ ‎a.k.a. ‎a‏ ‎phishing ‎threat.

And‏ ‎should‏ ‎this ‎score‏ ‎dare ‎exceed ‎the ‎sanctity ‎of‏ ‎our ‎pre-defined‏ ‎threshold—an‏ ‎arbitrary ‎line ‎in‏ ‎the ‎cyber‏ ‎sand—an ‎alert ‎is ‎generated.‏ ‎Because‏ ‎nothing ‎says‏ ‎«I’m ‎on‏ ‎top ‎of ‎things» ‎like ‎a‏ ‎good‏ ‎old-fashioned ‎alert.

This‏ ‎statistical ‎model‏ ‎isn’t ‎some ‎static ‎relic; ‎it’s‏ ‎a‏ ‎living,‏ ‎learning ‎creature.‏ ‎It’s ‎trained‏ ‎on ‎datasets‏ ‎teeming‏ ‎with ‎known‏ ‎phishing ‎and ‎non-phishing ‎examples ‎and‏ ‎is ‎periodically‏ ‎updated‏ ‎with ‎fresh ‎data‏ ‎to ‎keep‏ ‎up ‎with ‎the ‎ever-evolving‏ ‎fashion‏ ‎trends ‎of‏ ‎phishing ‎attacks.

Truly,‏ ‎we ‎are ‎blessed ‎to ‎have‏ ‎such‏ ‎an ‎innovative‏ ‎tool ‎at‏ ‎our ‎disposal, ‎tirelessly ‎defending ‎our‏ ‎digital‏ ‎realms‏ ‎from ‎the‏ ‎ceaseless ‎onslaught‏ ‎of ‎phishing‏ ‎attempts.‏ ‎What ‎would‏ ‎we ‎do ‎without ‎it? ‎Probably‏ ‎just ‎use‏ ‎common‏ ‎sense, ‎but ‎where’s‏ ‎the ‎fun‏ ‎in ‎that?

-----

This ‎document ‎will‏ ‎provide‏ ‎a ‎analysis‏ ‎of ‎patent‏ ‎US11611582B2, ‎which ‎describes ‎a ‎computer-implemented‏ ‎method‏ ‎for ‎detecting‏ ‎phishing ‎threats.‏ ‎The ‎analysis ‎will ‎cover ‎various‏ ‎aspects‏ ‎of‏ ‎the ‎patent,‏ ‎including ‎its‏ ‎technical ‎details,‏ ‎potential‏ ‎applications, ‎and‏ ‎implications ‎for ‎cybersecurity ‎professionals ‎and‏ ‎other ‎industry‏ ‎sectors.

Furthermore,‏ ‎it ‎has ‎a‏ ‎relevance ‎to‏ ‎the ‎evolving ‎landscape ‎of‏ ‎DevSecOps‏ ‎underscores ‎its‏ ‎potential ‎to‏ ‎contribute ‎to ‎more ‎secure ‎and‏ ‎efficient‏ ‎software ‎development‏ ‎lifecycles ‎as‏ ‎it ‎offers ‎a ‎methodical ‎approach‏ ‎to‏ ‎phishing‏ ‎detection ‎that‏ ‎can ‎be‏ ‎adopted ‎by‏ ‎various‏ ‎tools ‎and‏ ‎services ‎to ‎safeguard ‎users ‎and‏ ‎organizations ‎from‏ ‎malicious‏ ‎online ‎activities. ‎Cybersecurity‏ ‎professionals ‎should‏ ‎consider ‎integrating ‎such ‎methods‏ ‎into‏ ‎their ‎defensive‏ ‎strategies ‎to‏ ‎stay ‎ahead ‎of ‎emerging ‎threats.


Unpacking‏ ‎with‏ ‎more ‎detail

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Patent US11496512B2

Let’s ‎dive‏ ‎into ‎the ‎thrilling ‎world ‎of‏ ‎patent ‎of‏ ‎Lookout,‏ ‎Inc., ‎a ‎masterpiece‏ ‎ingeniously ‎titled‏ ‎«Detecting ‎Real ‎time ‎Phishing‏ ‎from‏ ‎a ‎Phished‏ ‎Client ‎or‏ ‎at ‎a ‎Security ‎Server.» ‎Because,‏ ‎you‏ ‎know, ‎the‏ ‎world ‎was‏ ‎desperately ‎waiting ‎for ‎another ‎patent‏ ‎to‏ ‎save‏ ‎us ‎from‏ ‎the ‎clutches‏ ‎of ‎phishing‏ ‎attacks.

In‏ ‎a ‎world‏ ‎teeming ‎with ‎cyber ‎security ‎solutions,‏ ‎our ‎valiant‏ ‎inventors‏ ‎have ‎emerged ‎with‏ ‎a ‎groundbreaking‏ ‎method: ‎inserting ‎an ‎encoded‏ ‎tracking‏ ‎value ‎(ETV)‏ ‎into ‎webpages.‏ ‎This ‎revolutionary ‎technique ‎promises ‎to‏ ‎shield‏ ‎us ‎from‏ ‎the ‎ever-so-slight‏ ‎inconvenience ‎of ‎phishing ‎attacks ‎by‏ ‎tracking‏ ‎our‏ ‎every ‎move‏ ‎online. ‎How‏ ‎comforting!

----

This ‎document‏ ‎provides‏ ‎an ‎in-depth‏ ‎analysis ‎of ‎US11496512B2, ‎a ‎patent‏ ‎that ‎outlines‏ ‎innovative‏ ‎techniques ‎for ‎detecting‏ ‎phishing ‎websites.‏ ‎The ‎analysis ‎covers ‎various‏ ‎aspects‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎patent, ‎including‏ ‎its ‎technical ‎foundation, ‎implementation ‎strategies,‏ ‎and‏ ‎potential ‎impact‏ ‎on ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎practices. ‎By ‎dissecting ‎the ‎methodology,‏ ‎this‏ ‎document‏ ‎aims ‎to‏ ‎offer ‎a‏ ‎comprehensive ‎understanding‏ ‎of‏ ‎its ‎contributions‏ ‎to ‎enhancing ‎online ‎security.

This ‎analysis‏ ‎provides ‎a‏ ‎qualitative‏ ‎unpacking ‎of ‎US11496512B2,‏ ‎offering ‎insights‏ ‎into ‎its ‎innovative ‎approach‏ ‎to‏ ‎phishing ‎detection.‏ ‎The ‎document‏ ‎not ‎only ‎elucidates ‎the ‎technical‏ ‎underpinnings‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎patent ‎but‏ ‎also ‎explores ‎its ‎practical ‎applications,‏ ‎security‏ ‎benefits,‏ ‎and ‎potential‏ ‎challenges. ‎This‏ ‎examination ‎is‏ ‎important‏ ‎for ‎cybersecurity‏ ‎professionals, ‎IT ‎specialists, ‎and ‎stakeholders‏ ‎in ‎various‏ ‎industries‏ ‎seeking ‎to ‎understand‏ ‎and ‎implement‏ ‎advanced ‎phishing ‎detection ‎techniques.


Unpacking‏ ‎in‏ ‎more ‎detail

Читать: 3+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Patent US11483343B2

Ah, ‎behold‏ ‎the ‎marvel ‎that ‎is ‎US11483343B2,‏ ‎a ‎patent‏ ‎that‏ ‎boldly ‎claims ‎to‏ ‎revolutionize ‎the‏ ‎fight ‎against ‎the ‎digital‏ ‎age’s‏ ‎oldest ‎trick:‏ ‎phishing. ‎Because,‏ ‎of ‎course, ‎what ‎we’ve ‎all‏ ‎been‏ ‎missing ‎is‏ ‎yet ‎another‏ ‎«advanced» ‎system ‎promising ‎to ‎save‏ ‎us‏ ‎from‏ ‎the ‎nefarious‏ ‎links ‎lurking‏ ‎in ‎our‏ ‎inboxes.‏ ‎This ‎patent,‏ ‎with ‎its ‎grandiose ‎title ‎«Phishing‏ ‎Detection ‎System‏ ‎and‏ ‎Method ‎of ‎Use,‏ ‎» ‎introduces‏ ‎a ‎supposedly ‎novel ‎architecture‏ ‎designed‏ ‎to ‎sniff‏ ‎out ‎phishing‏ ‎attempts ‎by ‎scanning ‎messages ‎for‏ ‎suspicious‏ ‎URLs. ‎Groundbreaking,‏ ‎isn’t ‎it?

And‏ ‎so, ‎we ‎arrive ‎at ‎the‏ ‎pièce‏ ‎de‏ ‎résistance: ‎a‏ ‎multi-stage ‎phishing‏ ‎detection ‎system‏ ‎that‏ ‎not ‎only‏ ‎scans ‎messages ‎but ‎also ‎resolves‏ ‎URLs, ‎extracts‏ ‎webpage‏ ‎features, ‎and ‎employs‏ ‎machine ‎learning‏ ‎to ‎distinguish ‎friend ‎from‏ ‎foe.‏ ‎A ‎solution‏ ‎so ‎advanced,‏ ‎it ‎almost ‎makes ‎one ‎wonder‏ ‎how‏ ‎we ‎ever‏ ‎managed ‎to‏ ‎survive ‎the ‎internet ‎without ‎it.‏ ‎While‏ ‎it‏ ‎boldly ‎strides‏ ‎into ‎the‏ ‎battlefield ‎of‏ ‎cybersecurity,‏ ‎one ‎can’t‏ ‎help ‎but ‎ponder ‎the ‎performance‏ ‎and ‎accuracy‏ ‎challenges‏ ‎that ‎lie ‎ahead‏ ‎in ‎the‏ ‎ever-evolving ‎phishing ‎landscape.

-----

This ‎document‏ ‎provides‏ ‎a ‎comprehensive‏ ‎analysis ‎of‏ ‎the ‎patent ‎US11483343B2, ‎which ‎pertains‏ ‎to‏ ‎a ‎phishing‏ ‎detection ‎system‏ ‎and ‎method ‎of ‎use. ‎The‏ ‎analysis‏ ‎will‏ ‎delve ‎into‏ ‎various ‎aspects‏ ‎of ‎the‏ ‎patent,‏ ‎including ‎its‏ ‎technological ‎underpinnings, ‎the ‎novelty ‎of‏ ‎the ‎invention,‏ ‎its‏ ‎potential ‎applications. ‎A‏ ‎high-quality ‎summary‏ ‎of ‎the ‎document ‎is‏ ‎presented,‏ ‎highlighting ‎the‏ ‎key ‎elements‏ ‎that ‎contribute ‎to ‎its ‎significance‏ ‎in‏ ‎the ‎field‏ ‎of ‎cybersecurity.

The‏ ‎analysis ‎is ‎beneficial ‎for ‎security‏ ‎professionals,‏ ‎IT‏ ‎experts, ‎and‏ ‎stakeholders ‎in‏ ‎various ‎industries,‏ ‎providing‏ ‎them ‎with‏ ‎a ‎distilled ‎essence ‎of ‎the‏ ‎patent ‎and‏ ‎its‏ ‎utility ‎in ‎enhancing‏ ‎cybersecurity ‎measures.‏ ‎It ‎serves ‎as ‎a‏ ‎valuable‏ ‎resource ‎for‏ ‎understanding ‎the‏ ‎patented ‎technology’s ‎contribution ‎to ‎the‏ ‎ongoing‏ ‎efforts ‎to‏ ‎combat ‎phishing‏ ‎and ‎other ‎cyber ‎threats.


Unpacking ‎with‏ ‎more‏ ‎detail


Читать: 6+ мин
logo Snarky Security

Patent US20220232015A1 / Preventing cloud-based phishing attacks using shared documents with malicious links

Another ‎patent‏ ‎that ‎promises ‎to ‎revolutionize ‎the‏ ‎thrilling ‎world‏ ‎of‏ ‎network ‎security ‎with‏ ‎US20220232015A1. Brace ‎yourselves‏ ‎for ‎a ‎riveting ‎tale‏ ‎of‏ ‎inline ‎proxies,‏ ‎synthetic ‎requests,‏ ‎and ‎the ‎ever-so-captivating ‎inline ‎metadata‏ ‎generation‏ ‎logic. ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎the‏ ‎Avengers, ‎but ‎instead ‎of ‎superheroes,‏ ‎we‏ ‎have‏ ‎network ‎security‏ ‎components ‎saving‏ ‎the ‎day.

It’s‏ ‎essentially‏ ‎a ‎glorified‏ ‎bouncer ‎for ‎your ‎corporate ‎network,‏ ‎deciding ‎which‏ ‎document‏ ‎files ‎get ‎to‏ ‎strut ‎down‏ ‎the ‎digital ‎red ‎carpet‏ ‎and‏ ‎which ‎ones‏ ‎get ‎the‏ ‎boot. ‎This ‎system, ‎armed ‎with‏ ‎an‏ ‎inline ‎proxy‏ ‎(because ‎apparently,‏ ‎«inline» ‎makes ‎anything ‎sound ‎more‏ ‎tech-savvy),‏ ‎stands‏ ‎guard ‎between‏ ‎the ‎cloud‏ ‎and ‎the‏ ‎corporate‏ ‎network ‎like‏ ‎a ‎knight ‎in ‎shining ‎armor—except‏ ‎it’s ‎fighting‏ ‎off‏ ‎data ‎packets ‎instead‏ ‎of ‎dragons.

This‏ ‎system ‎doesn’t ‎just ‎blindly‏ ‎swing‏ ‎its ‎sword‏ ‎at ‎anything‏ ‎that ‎moves. ‎Oh ‎no, ‎it’s‏ ‎got‏ ‎finesse. ‎It‏ ‎identifies ‎document‏ ‎files ‎trying ‎to ‎sneak ‎into‏ ‎the‏ ‎corporate‏ ‎network ‎using‏ ‎«various ‎methods‏ ‎and ‎metadata,‏ ‎»‏ ‎which ‎is‏ ‎a ‎fancy ‎way ‎of ‎saying‏ ‎it’s ‎really‏ ‎nosy‏ ‎and ‎likes ‎to‏ ‎snoop ‎around.‏ ‎And ‎then, ‎like ‎a‏ ‎judgy‏ ‎gatekeeper, ‎it‏ ‎categorizes ‎these‏ ‎documents ‎into ‎three ‎cliques: ‎the‏ ‎sanctioned‏ ‎(the ‎cool‏ ‎kids ‎allowed‏ ‎in ‎without ‎a ‎fuss), ‎the‏ ‎blacklisted‏ ‎(the‏ ‎troublemakers ‎permanently‏ ‎exiled ‎to‏ ‎the ‎land‏ ‎of‏ ‎«Access ‎Denied»),‏ ‎and ‎the ‎unknown ‎(the ‎mysterious‏ ‎strangers ‎who‏ ‎need‏ ‎a ‎thorough ‎background‏ ‎check).

The ‎patent‏ ‎goes ‎on ‎to ‎wax‏ ‎poetic‏ ‎about ‎the‏ ‎use ‎of‏ ‎policy-based ‎rules, ‎threat ‎scanning, ‎and‏ ‎sandboxing‏ ‎for ‎those‏ ‎unknown ‎or‏ ‎potentially ‎malicious ‎documents. ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎says‏ ‎«cutting-edge‏ ‎technology» ‎like‏ ‎treating ‎every‏ ‎document ‎like‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎a ‎ticking‏ ‎time ‎bomb.


Let’s ‎dive ‎into ‎this‏ ‎page-turner, ‎shall‏ ‎we?

First‏ ‎off, ‎we ‎have‏ ‎the ‎«Network‏ ‎Security ‎System, ‎» ‎a‏ ‎groundbreaking‏ ‎invention ‎that—hold‏ ‎your ‎applause—acts‏ ‎as ‎a ‎middleman ‎between ‎clients‏ ‎and‏ ‎cloud ‎applications.‏ ‎Because ‎if‏ ‎there’s ‎anything ‎we ‎need, ‎it’s‏ ‎more‏ ‎intermediaries‏ ‎in ‎our‏ ‎lives, ‎right?‏ ‎This ‎system‏ ‎is‏ ‎so ‎dedicated‏ ‎to ‎enhancing ‎security ‎in ‎cloud-based‏ ‎environments ‎that‏ ‎it‏ ‎practically ‎wears ‎a‏ ‎cape.

Next ‎up,‏ ‎«Synthetic ‎Request ‎Generation.» ‎The‏ ‎system‏ ‎doesn’t ‎just‏ ‎handle ‎requests;‏ ‎oh ‎no, ‎it ‎creates ‎its‏ ‎own.‏ ‎Because ‎why‏ ‎wait ‎for‏ ‎trouble ‎when ‎you ‎can ‎conjure‏ ‎it‏ ‎up‏ ‎yourself? ‎It’s‏ ‎like ‎inviting‏ ‎a ‎vampire‏ ‎into‏ ‎your ‎house‏ ‎just ‎to ‎see ‎if ‎your‏ ‎garlic ‎wreath‏ ‎works.

And‏ ‎let’s ‎not ‎forget‏ ‎the ‎«Inline‏ ‎Metadata ‎Generation ‎Logic.» ‎This‏ ‎isn’t‏ ‎just ‎any‏ ‎logic; ‎it’s‏ ‎inline, ‎which ‎means… ‎something ‎very‏ ‎important,‏ ‎no ‎doubt.‏ ‎It’s ‎configured‏ ‎to ‎issue ‎synthetic ‎requests, ‎adding‏ ‎an‏ ‎extra‏ ‎layer ‎of‏ ‎complexity ‎because,‏ ‎clearly, ‎what‏ ‎our‏ ‎lives ‎lack‏ ‎is ‎complexity.

Then ‎there’s ‎the ‎«Separate‏ ‎Synthetic ‎Requests.»‏ ‎Because‏ ‎why ‎have ‎one‏ ‎type ‎of‏ ‎synthetic ‎request ‎when ‎you‏ ‎can‏ ‎have ‎two?‏ ‎Variety ‎is‏ ‎the ‎spice ‎of ‎life, ‎after‏ ‎all.‏ ‎This ‎technology‏ ‎is ‎like‏ ‎having ‎a ‎decoy ‎duck ‎in‏ ‎a‏ ‎pond‏ ‎full ‎of‏ ‎real ‎ducks,‏ ‎except ‎the‏ ‎ducks‏ ‎are ‎data,‏ ‎and ‎no ‎one’s ‎really ‎sure‏ ‎why ‎we‏ ‎need‏ ‎the ‎decoy ‎in‏ ‎the ‎first‏ ‎place.

Ah, ‎«Cloud ‎Policy ‎Enforcement,‏ ‎»‏ ‎the ‎pièce‏ ‎de ‎résistance.‏ ‎The ‎synthetic ‎request ‎injection ‎is‏ ‎used‏ ‎to ‎retrieve‏ ‎metadata ‎for‏ ‎cloud ‎policy ‎enforcement, ‎suggesting ‎that,‏ ‎yes,‏ ‎we‏ ‎can ‎enforce‏ ‎policies ‎in‏ ‎cloud ‎applications.‏ ‎Because‏ ‎if ‎there’s‏ ‎one ‎thing ‎cloud ‎applications ‎were‏ ‎missing, ‎it‏ ‎was‏ ‎more ‎policies.


Now, ‎for‏ ‎the ‎grand‏ ‎finale: ‎the ‎benefits ‎and‏ ‎drawbacks.

Benefits:

🗣"Enhanced‏ ‎Security»: ‎Because‏ ‎before ‎this‏ ‎patent, ‎everyone ‎was ‎just ‎winging‏ ‎it.

🗣"Proactive‏ ‎Threat ‎Detection»:‏ ‎It’s ‎like‏ ‎Minority ‎Report ‎for ‎your ‎network,‏ ‎but‏ ‎without‏ ‎Tom ‎Cruise.

🗣"Dynamic‏ ‎Policy ‎Enforcement»:‏ ‎Finally, ‎a‏ ‎way‏ ‎to ‎enforce‏ ‎those ‎policies ‎dynamically. ‎Static ‎policy‏ ‎enforcement ‎is‏ ‎so‏ ‎2020.

🗣"Efficiency»: ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎says ‎efficiency‏ ‎like ‎generating ‎synthetic ‎requests‏ ‎to‏ ‎test ‎your‏ ‎own ‎system.

🗣"Stability‏ ‎and ‎Consistency»: ‎Because ‎if ‎there’s‏ ‎one‏ ‎thing ‎we‏ ‎crave ‎in‏ ‎the ‎fast-paced ‎world ‎of ‎IT,‏ ‎it’s‏ ‎stability.‏ ‎Yawn.

Drawbacks:

🗣"Complexity»: ‎Who‏ ‎would’ve ‎thought‏ ‎adding ‎several‏ ‎layers‏ ‎of ‎synthetic‏ ‎requests ‎and ‎metadata ‎logic ‎would‏ ‎make ‎things‏ ‎more‏ ‎complex?

🗣"False ‎Positives/Negatives»: ‎Surprise!‏ ‎The ‎system‏ ‎that ‎invents ‎its ‎own‏ ‎problems‏ ‎sometimes ‎gets‏ ‎it ‎wrong.

🗣"Maintenance‏ ‎and ‎Updates»: ‎Because ‎the ‎one‏ ‎thing‏ ‎IT ‎departments‏ ‎complain ‎about‏ ‎not ‎having ‎enough ‎of ‎is‏ ‎maintenance‏ ‎work.

🗣"User‏ ‎Experience ‎Impact»:‏ ‎Because ‎nothing‏ ‎enhances ‎user‏ ‎experience‏ ‎quite ‎like‏ ‎being ‎told ‎your ‎legitimate ‎document‏ ‎is ‎a‏ ‎security‏ ‎threat.

🗣"Over-Reliance ‎on ‎Known‏ ‎Threats»: ‎Because‏ ‎who ‎needs ‎to ‎worry‏ ‎about‏ ‎unknown ‎threats‏ ‎when ‎you‏ ‎can ‎just ‎keep ‎focusing ‎on‏ ‎the‏ ‎ones ‎you‏ ‎already ‎know?


So‏ ‎there ‎you ‎have ‎it, ‎folks.‏ ‎Patent‏ ‎US20220232015A1‏ ‎is ‎set‏ ‎to ‎revolutionize‏ ‎the ‎way‏ ‎we‏ ‎think ‎about‏ ‎network ‎security, ‎turning ‎the ‎mundane‏ ‎task ‎of‏ ‎document‏ ‎file ‎management ‎into‏ ‎a ‎saga‏ ‎worthy ‎of ‎its ‎own‏ ‎epic‏ ‎trilogy. ‎Move‏ ‎over, ‎Lord‏ ‎of ‎the ‎Rings; ‎there’s ‎a‏ ‎new‏ ‎tale ‎of‏ ‎adventure ‎in‏ ‎town, ‎complete ‎with ‎inline ‎proxies,‏ ‎metadata,‏ ‎and‏ ‎the ‎ever-thrilling‏ ‎sandboxing. ‎Who‏ ‎knew ‎network‏ ‎security‏ ‎could ‎be‏ ‎so… ‎exhilarating?


Unpacking ‎in ‎more ‎detail

Подарить подписку

Будет создан код, который позволит адресату получить бесплатный для него доступ на определённый уровень подписки.

Оплата за этого пользователя будет списываться с вашей карты вплоть до отмены подписки. Код может быть показан на экране или отправлен по почте вместе с инструкцией.

Будет создан код, который позволит адресату получить сумму на баланс.

Разово будет списана указанная сумма и зачислена на баланс пользователя, воспользовавшегося данным промокодом.

Добавить карту
0/2048